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" It is the spoudaiotes, the high and excellent seriousness, which Aristotle assigns as one of the grand virtues of poetry. The substance of Chaucer's poetry, his view of things and his criticism of life, has largeness, freedom, shrewdness, benignity; but... "
Essays in Criticism: Second Series - Page 31
by Matthew Arnold - 1888 - 331 pages
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The English Poets, Volume 1

Thomas Humphry Ward - English poetry - 1885 - 628 pages
...glorious class of the best. And there is no doubt what that something is. It is the o-nouSaiorr/s, the high and excellent seriousness, which Aristotle...freedom, shrewdness, benignity ; but it has not this high seiiousness. Homer's criticism of life has it, Dante's has it, Shakespeare's has it. It is this chiefly...
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English Literature and Irish Politics

Matthew Arnold - Literary Criticism - 1973 - 508 pages
...35 that something is. It is the irirov8aum/.;, the high and excellent seriousness, which Aristorle assigns as one of the grand virtues of poetry. The...spirits what they can rest upon; and with the increasing demands of our modern ages 5 upon poetry, this virtue of giving us what we can rest upon will be more...
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Doing Things with Texts: Essays in Criticism and Critical Theory

Meyer Howard Abrams - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 452 pages
...essential aspect of the poetic quality of the greatest writers such as Homer, Dante, and Shakespeare: "The substance of Chaucer's poetry, his view of things...freedom, shrewdness, benignity; but it has not this high seriousness."33 From evidences in this one sentence we can infer some important presuppositions which,...
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Time and the Astrolabe in the Canterbury Tales

Marijane Osborn - Poetry - 2002 - 380 pages
...Tales, which on a first reading may well appear, as Matthew Arnold said of Chaucer generally, to lack "the high and excellent seriousness which Aristotle assigns as one of the grand virtues of poetry" (Arnold 675). Astronomical and related perspectives are, however, among the elements that confer a...
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Chaucer's Dead Body: From Corpse to Corpus

Thomas Augustine Prendergast - Authors and readers - 2004 - 198 pages
...as well: Finally, I am not greatly concerued ahout Chaucer's alleged defect of 'the aTrouSaLorTn;, the high and excellent seriousness, which Aristotle assigns as one of the grand virtues of poetry.' . . . that poet was not deficient in seriousness, high or deep. He had, to be sure, no 'message.' But...
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Chaucer's Dead Body: From Corpse to Corpus

Thomas Augustine Prendergast - Authors and readers - 2004 - 198 pages
...as well: Finally, I am not greatly concerned about Chaucer's alleged defect of 'the CTTTouoaioTT1^, the high and excellent seriousness, which Aristotle assigns as one of the gtand virtues of poetry.' . . . that poet was not deficieot in seriousness, high or deep. He had, to...
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Correspondences: Medievalism in Scholarship and the Arts

T. A. Shippey, Martin Arnold - Art, Medieval - 2005 - 260 pages
...his ability to teach a benign truth - had most famously lamented Chaucer's lack of "O7tOu6ou6T1'l<;, the high and excellent seriousness, which Aristotle assigns as one of the grand virtues of poetry."50 TS Eliot, who had "not a scrap of sympathy with or interest in Chaucer,"51 thought much...
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The Yale Companion to Chaucer

Seth Lerer - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 446 pages
...English poetry and for "the lovely charm of his diction, the lovely charm of his movement." And yet, "The substance of Chaucer's poetry, his view of things...spirits what they can rest upon; and with the increasing demands of our modern ages upon poetry, this virtue of giving us what we can rest upon will be more...
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five hundred years of chaucer criticism and allusion

Caroline Frances Eleanor Spurgeon - 1925 - 478 pages
...something is. It is the tnrouSaionjc, the high and excellent seriousness which Aristotle assigns as one [p- of the grand virtues of poetry. The substance of Chaucer's...what they can rest upon ; and with the increasing demands of our modern ages upon poetry, this virtue of giving us what we can rest upon will be more...
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Littell's Living Age, Volume 162

American periodicals - 1884 - 866 pages
...examination. But Chaucer and Burns? These are not quite up to the mark. They want " the axovdato-nK, the high and excellent seriousness which Aristotle assigns as one of the grand virtues of poetry." As for Dryden and Pope, "though they may write in verse, though they may in a certain sense be masters...
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