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" Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both day and night... "
The Kilmarnock mirror, and literary gleaner - Page 92
1819
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - English language - 1816 - 326 pages
...not in vain ; nor think, though men were none, That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise : Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. All these witty ceaseless praise his works behold, Both day and night. How often, from the steep Of echoing hill...
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The Triangle

Samuel Whelpley - Antinomianism - 1816 - 362 pages
...spurt with the laws of reason, I was surprised at what I saw, and recollected the words of the poet : " Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep." At that moment tr.y curiosity was awakened to know whether I had not one of these aerial attendants...
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The beauties of The Spectator 2nd ed., revised and enlarged with The vision ...

Spectator The - 1816 - 372 pages
...following passage. Nor think, though men were none, That heaven would want spectators, God want praise : Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen , both when we wake and when we deep; All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both day and night. How often from the steep...
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A Key to the Exercises Adapted to Murray's English Grammar: Calculated to ...

Lindley Murray - English language - 1816 - 186 pages
...not dully. The silent stranger stood amaz'd to see Contempt of wealth, and wilful poverty. RULE VII. All these with ceaseless praise his works behold, Both day and night. In all our reasonings, our minds should be sincerely employed in the pursuit of truth. Rude behaviour,...
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The English Reader, Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry: Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - English literature - 1819 - 264 pages
...not in vain ; nor think, though men were none. That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise • Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen...How often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket hare we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole or responsive each to others' note, Singing...
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The British essayists; to which are prefixed prefaces by J. Ferguson, Volume 37

British essayists - 1819 - 370 pages
...passage : — Nor think, though men were none, That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise : Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen,...Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive each to other's note, Singing their great Creator? Oft in bands, While they keep watch, or nightly...
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The American Orator, Or, Elegant Extracts in Prose and Poetry: Comprehending ...

Increase Cooke - American literature - 1819 - 494 pages
...not in vain ; nor think though men were none, That heaven would want spectators, God want praise'. Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen,...Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive each to others' note, Singing their great Creator ? Oft in bands, While they keep watch, or nightly...
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An English Grammar: Comprehending the Principles and Rules of the ..., Volume 1

Lindley Murray - English language - 1819 - 716 pages
...30. The warmth of disputation, destroys that sedateness of mind which is necessary to discover truth. All these with ceaseless praise his works behold, Both day and night. In all our reasonings, our mind should be tincerely employed in the pursuit of truth. Rude behaviour,...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem, in Twelve Books

John Milton - Fall of man - 1820 - 340 pages
...Shine not in vain ; nor think, tho' men were none, That Heav'n would want spectators, God want praise. Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen,...behold Both day and night. How often from the steep 680 Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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Select Works of the British Poets: With Biographical and Critical ..., Volume 1

John Aikin - English poetry - 1820 - 832 pages
...not in vain ; nor think, though men were none, That Heaven would want spectators, God want praise: : bow often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight...
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