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" This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve By his loved mansionry that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here : no jutty, frieze, Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle : Where... "
ARCHIV FUR DAS STUDIUM DER NEUEREN SPRACHEN UND LITERATUREN - Page 203
by LUDWIG HERRIC - 1864
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1829
...senses. Ban. This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve, By his lov'd maiiMonry, that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here ; no jutty, frieze, buttress, Nor coime oí vanUiiíC,12 but this bird hath made His pendent bed, am! procréant cradle : Where they...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1830
...reader, by introducing some quiet rural image, or picture of familiar domestic life. — Sir J. REYNOLDS. Smells wooingly here: no jutty, 'frieze, Buttress,...procreant cradle : Where they most breed and haunt, I have observ'd, The air is delicate. Enter Lady MACBETH. Dun. N See, see.! our honour'd hostess ! The love...
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Magazine of Natural History, Volume 3

Natural history - 1830
...• " This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve, By his loved mansionry, that heaven's breath Smells wooingly here. No jutty, frieze,...vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed and procrcant cradle. Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed The air is delicate." Macbeth. From...
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The Edinburgh Literary Journal: Or, Weekly Register of Criticism ..., Volume 3

Great Britain - 1830
...beauty with which Skakgpeare relieve« the dense horrors brooding over Macbcth's castle — " This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve, By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breast Smells wooingly here." One only drawback is felt iu traversing these moontain scenes. Go where...
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Lectures on English Poetry: From the Reign of Edward the Third, to the Time ...

Henry Neele - English poetry - 1830 - 543 pages
...his nest outside of Macbeth' s castle : — " This guest of Summer, The temple-haunting Martlet, doth approve, By his loved mansionry, that the Heaven's breath Smells wooingly here." Or his description of the infant sons of Edward the Fourth sleeping in the Tower : — " Their lips...
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The Monthly Review

Books - 1831
...lov'd mansionry, that the heaven's breath Swells wooingly here ; no jutty, frieze, Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed,...procreant cradle : Where they most breed and haunt, I have observ'd The air is delicate." ' But the attractions of poetry are not required to give a charm to...
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The Dramatic Works and Poems of William Shakespeare, with Notes ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1831
...our gentle senses. Ban. This guest of summer, Fhc temple-haunting martlet, does approve, By hie lovM have seen it, the woe had been universal. 1 Geni. Are they returned to the court ? S Ч i tit. No : vantage,6 but this bird Shake my deaiirn, nor make it fall before *Tis ripen'd to effect.1 1 To pott-,...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1831 - 504 pages
...our gentle senses. Ban. This truest ofsummer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve, By his lov'd mansionry, that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here ; no jutty, frieze, buttress, Nor roi MI- of vantage,11 but this bird hath made His pendent bed, and procreant cradle : Where they Most...
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The American Monthly Magazine, Volume 1

American literature - 1833
...pleasant seat ; the air Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself Unto our centle senses. — , Ban. This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve...frieze, buttress Nor coigne of 'vantage, but this bird haul made His pendent bed, and procréant cradle : where they Most breed and haunt, I have observed,...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ...

William Shakespeare - 1833 - 1064 pages
...the heaven's breath, Smells wooiugly here: no julty, frieze, buttress, Nor coigne of vantage, 5 s) , poor soul! seeming as burdened observ'd, the air Is delicate. Enter Lady MACBETH. Dun. See, see! our honour'd hostess! The love that...
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