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" tis all a cheat; Yet, fooled with hope, men favour the deceit; Trust on, and think to-morrow will repay: To-morrow's falser than the former day; Lies worse, and, while it says, we shall be blest With some new joys, cuts off what we possest. "
The Enquirer: Or, Literary, Mathematical, and Philosophical Repository ... - Page 49
edited by - 1812
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The Life of Samuel Johnson, L.L. D.: Including A Journal of a Tour ..., Volume 2

James Boswell - 1843
...we possest. Slraiige cozenage! none would live past years again ; Yet all hope pleasure in what yet remain ; And from the dregs of life think to receive...What the first sprightly running could not give'." It was observed to Dr. Johnson, that it seemed strange that he, who has so often delighted his company...
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The Illuminated Magazine, Volume 2

William James Linton - 1844
...former day, Lies more, and when it says we shall be blest With some new joy, cuts off what we possest. Strange cozenage ! none would live past years again, Yet all hope pleasure in what still remain, And from the dregs of life think to receive What the fresh sprightly running...
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Memoirs of the Court of England, from the Revolution in 1688 to ..., Volume 1

John Heneage Jesse - Great Britain - 1846
...and when it says we shall be blest With some new joy, cuts off what we possessed. Strange cozenage 1 none would live past years again, Yet all hope pleasure from what still remain ; And from the dregs of hfe think to receive What the fresh sprightly running could not give : I 'm tired with waiting for...
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Materials for thinking extracted from the works of the learned of all ages

Materials - 1846
...; Lies more, and while it says we shall be bless'd With some new joys, cuts off what we possess'd: Strange cozenage ! none would live past years again ; Yet all hope pleasure in what yet remain : And from the dregs of life think to receive What the first sprightly running could...
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Boswell's Life of Johnson: Including Their Tour to the Hebrides

James Boswell, John Wilson Croker - Authors, English - 1848 - 874 pages
...enjoyed, in the general condition of human life ; and frequently quoted those lines of Dryden; — ' Strange cozenage ! none would live past years again, Yet all hope pleasure from what still remain.'' For his part, he said, he never passed that week in his life which he would wish to repeat, were an...
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The Family friend [ed. by R.K. Philp]., Volume 5

Robert Kemp Philp
...degree, Our debtors, false friends and coquettes, All answer alike, " We shall see ! " HOPE. DRYDEN. STRANGE cozenage ! none would live past years again, Yet all hope pleasure in what yet remain : And from the dregs of life think to receive What the first sprightly running could...
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Sabrinae Corolla in Hortulis Regiae Scholae Salopiensis

Benjamin Hall Kennedy - Classical languages - 1850 - 328 pages
...we possessed. Strange coz'nage ! none would live past years again, Yet all hope pleasure in what yet remain, And from the dregs of life think to receive What the first sprightly running could not give. I'm tired with waiting for this chymic gold, Which fools us young, and beggars us when old. Anacreóntica....
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The life of Samuel Johnson. [Followed by] The journal of a tour to ..., Volume 4

James Boswell - 1851
...day ; Lies worse ; and while it says we shall be blest With some new joys, cuts off what we possest. Strange cozenage ! none would live past years again ; Yet all hope pleasure in what yet remain ; And from the dregs of life think to receive What the first sprightly running could...
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Harper's Magazine, Volume 5

Henry Mills Alden, Frederick Lewis Allen, Lee Foster Hartman, Thomas Bucklin Wells - Literature - 1852
...not caleulated on requiring. They were of those who encourage late ambition — " And from the drcgR of life think to receive What the first sprightly running could not give." The first of these was a bachelor of some fiftyfive, formerly a medical practitioner, now retired,...
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A cyclopædia of poetical quotations, arranged by H.G. Adams

Cyclopaedia - 1853 - 733 pages
...posscss'd: Strange cozenage! no one would lire past years again, Yet all hope pleasure in what yet remain: And from the dregs of life think to receive...What' the first sprightly running could not give. I'm tired with waiting for this chymic gold, Which fools us young, and beggars us when old. Dryden....
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