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" About an age or two ago, this kind of wit was very much in vogue among our countrymen, who did not practise it, "
A French Grammar: To which is Prefixed, an Analysis Relating to that Subject - Page 91
by René Labutte - 1790 - 112 pages
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Lectures on rhetoric &c

Hugh Blair - 1820
...the relative who from its antecedent our countrymen / in this way : " About an *' age or two ago, • this kind of wit was very much •" in vogue among our countrymen, who" did not " practise it for any oblique reason, but purely for the " sake of being witty." — Spectator,...
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The Elements of English Composition: Serving as a Sequel to the Study of Grammar

David Irving - English language - 1821 - 318 pages
...manner as not to separate the relative who from its antecedent countrymen, " About an age or two ago, this kind of wit was very much in vogue among our countrymen, who did not practise it for any oblique reason, but purely for the sake of being willy." ~ It it folly...
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THE KEY TO THE EXERCISES FOR THE ILLUSTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT OF THE RULES ...

W. JILLARD HORT - 1822
...man, we remained silent, ashamed, confounded, daunted. 3. About an age or two ago, (says Addison,) this kind of wit was very much in vogue among our countrymen, who did not practise it for any oblique reason, but purely for the sake of being witty. ourselves ugaiimt...
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English Exercises ...: With which the Corresponding Notes, Rules, and ...

Lindley Murray - English language - 1828 - 252 pages
...separate the relative who from its antecedent our countrymen, in this way : " About an age or two ago, this kind of wit was very much in vogue among our countrymen, who did not practise it,' &c. (19.) With regard to relatives, it may be further observed, that obscurity...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres ...: To which are Added, Copious ...

Hugh Blair - Rhetoric - 1833 - 549 pages
...separate the relative who, from its antecedent our countrymen; in this way: ' About an age or two ago, this kind of wit was very much in vogue among our countrymen, who did not practise it for any oblique reason, but purely for the sake of being witty.' Spectator,...
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English Grammar: Adapted to the Different Classes of Learners. With an ...

Lindley Murray - 1834 - 340 pages
...separate the relative who from its antecedent, our countrymen; in this way: "About an age or two ago, this kind of wit was very much in vogue among our countrymen, who did not practise it," &c. The following passage is still more censurable. " It is folly to pretend...
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English Exercises: Consisting of Exercises in Parsing, Instances of False ...

Lindley Murray - 1835
...separate the relative who from its antecedent ottr countrymen , in this way : " About an age or two ago, this kind of wit was very much in vogue among our countrymen, who did not practise it,' tec. (19.) With regard to relatives, it may be further observed, that obscurity...
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Murray's English Exercises: Consisting of Exercises in Parsing ... with ...

Lindley Murray - 1837
...separate the relative who from its antecedent our countrymen , in this way : " Aboutan age or two ago, this kind of wit was very much in vogue among our countrymen, who did not practise it, &c. (19.) With regard to relatives, it may be further observed, that obscurity...
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A Grammar of Rhetoric, and Polite Literature: Comprehending the Principles ...

Alexander Jamieson - English language - 1839 - 306 pages
...awkward and disjointed in the structure of the sentence. fllim. 1. " This kind of wit was very milch in vogue among our countrymen, about an age or two ago, who did not practise it for any oblique reason, but purely for the sake of being witty."* We are at no loss about...
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A Grammar of Rhetoric and Polite Literature: Comprehending the Principles of ...

Alexander Jamieson - English language - 1840 - 306 pages
...place, we always find something awkward and disjointed in the structure of the sentence. Illus. 1. " This kind of wit was very much in vogue among our countrymen, about an age or two ago, who did not practise it for any oblique reason, but purely for iho aa:ce of being witty."* We are at no loss about...
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