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LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.,'

BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.
NEW YORK: SCRIBNER, WELFORD AND ARMSTRONG.

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CONTENT S.

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XXXII.2

KATA

ITYZKI DO

11K221

10381

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PAGE

PARADISE REGAINED.

I7YIYI

Book I.

IIIVEZZI I. 367

Book II.

Book JII.

• TT

395

Book IV.

10

408

SAMSON AGONISTES

427

SONNETS AND CANZONE.

To the Nightingale

477

Canzone

478

On His being arrived at the Age of

Twenty-three

2480

When the Assault was intended to

the City

481

To a Virtuous Young Lady.

481

To the Lady Margaret Ley

482

On the Detraction which followed

upon My Writing Certain Trea-

tises

483

On the Same

483

To Mr. H. Lawes, on the Publishing

His Airs

484

On the Religious Memory of Mrs.

Catherine Thomson

485

To the Lord General Fairfax

485

To the Lord General Cromwell 486

To Sir Henry Vane the Younger

487

On the Late Massacre in Piedmont 487

On His Blindness

488

To Mr. Lawrence

489

To Cyriac Skinner

489

To the Same

490

On His Deceased Wife

491

MISCELLANEOUS POEM AND TRANSLATIONS

On the New Forcers of Conscience

under the Long Parliament 492

The Fifth Ode of Horace, Lib. I.

493

From Geoffrey of Monmouth

493

From Dante

494

From Ariosto

494

From Horace

494

From Horace

495

From Euripides

496

Fron) Horace

495

From Sophocles

495

From Seneca

496

From Homer

496

(1 2

Aristoteles Intellexit

564

tum Præconis Academici, Can-

Ad Patrem

565

tabrigiensis

532 Ad Salsillum, Poetam Romanum,

Eleg. III. Anno ætatis 17. In

Ægrotantem

568

Obitum Præsulis Wintoniensis 533 Mansus

570

Eleg. IV. Anno Ætatis 18. Ad

Epitaphium Damonis

573

Thomam Junium præceptorem

Ad Joannem Rousium Oxoniensis

suum,apud mercatores Anglicos

Academia Bibliothecarium 579
i Numbers to houses were very rare till 1756. It is said, that the first house numbered in London was No. 1, Strand, which still, we believe, stands next to Northumberland House.- Athenceum.

.

PREFATORY MEMOIR OF MILTON.

The great epic Poet of England was born at a period of change and political agitation, which gave a variety of incident to his life not often found in those of students and writers.

John Milton was born December 9th, 1608, between six and seven in the morning, at the “Spread Eagle,” in Bread Street, Londonnot a tavern, as our non-antiquarian readers might suppose, but his father's own house, distinguished by the sign of his armorial bear. ings, as were the houses of even the nobility at that period, when dwellings were not numbered. 1

Milton was the son of John Milton, a gentleman by descent, whose ancestors had formerly possessed Milton, near Thame, in Oxfordshire; but this property they had forfeited during the Wars of the Roses, and the family had ceased to be Milton“ of that ilk' for more than a hundred years.

Milton's grandfather (also a John Milton), keeper of the forest of Shotover, was a bigoted Papist. He sent his son John to Christ Church, Oxford, for education, but the youth there imbibed the principles of the Reformation, and was consequently disinherited by his father.

Compelled to work for his living, John Milton adopted the profession of a Scrivener, which he practised at the "Spread Eagle," in Bread Street. He was a man of great ability, a classical scholar, and a good musician, and highly respected in his profession. He married Sarah Caston, the daughter of a Welsh gentleman. On December 9th, 1608, she became, as we have said, the mother of a son who was destined to immortalize the name of his parents.

We will here' let Milton speak of his own childhood :-My

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