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ABBREVIATIONS OF AUTHORS AND WORKS REFERRED TO.

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Pall.,

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Gai.,

Eur., Hipp., Hippolytus.

Iph. Aul., Iphigenia in Aulide.

Iph, Taur., Iphigenia in Tauris. » Or., Orestes.

Rhes., Rhesus.

Tr., Troades. Euseb.,

Eusebius. Fest., .

Sextus P. Festus. Flor., .

L. Annæus Florus.

Gaius.
Inst., Institutiones Juris Civilis.
Ge

Aulus Gellius.
Greg.,

S. Gregorius Magnus. Moral., Moralia. Greg. Turon., S. Gregorius Turonensis. Herod.,

Herodotus.
Hes., :

Hesiod.
Op. et D., Opera et Dies.
Th., Theogonia.

S. Hieronymus.
Ep., Epistolæ.

Homer.

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Hier., Hom.,

II., Iliad.

od.,

Hor.,

Inscr.,

Ov., M., Metamorphoses.

Med. Fac., Medicamina Faciei.
R. A., Remedium Amoris.
T., Tristia.

Palladius Rutilius Taurus. Pasc.,

Pascal.
Pens., Pensées.

Prov., Lettres Provinciales.
Pers.,

Persius.
Petr. or Petron., Petronius Arbiter.
Phædr. or Phæd., Phædrus.
Pind.,

Pindar.
"Olymp., odæ Olympicæ,

Pyth., ódæ Pythica.
Plat.,

Plato.
„ Charm., Charmides.

Phædr., Phædrus.
Plaut.,

Plautus,
Am., Amphitruo.
As., Asinaria.
Aul., Aulularia.
Bacch., Bacchides.
Capt., Captivi.
Cas., Casina.
Cist., Cistellaria.
Men., Menaechmi.
Merc., Mercator.
Mil., Miles Gloriosus.
Most., Mostellaria.
Pers., Persa.
Pen., Penulus.
Ps., Pseudolus,
Rud., Rudens.
Stich., Stichus.
Trin., Trinummus.

Truc., Truculentus.
Plin.,

Plinius (major). Hist. Nat. or H. N., Historia Naturalis. Plin. Sec. or Min., Plinius (minor). » Ep., Epistolæ. Pan., Panegyricus.

Plutarch.

Propertius.
Pub. Syr.,: Publius Syrus.
Quint.,

Quintilianus.
Decl., Declamationes.
Inst., Institutiones Oratoriæ.

Racine.
Britann., Britannicus.

Iph., Iphigénie.
Rouss. (J. B.), Jean Baptiste Rousseau, 1
Rouss. (J. J.), Jean Jacques Rousseau.

Sallustius. c., Catilina.

Fragm., Fragmenta. » H., Historia

J., Jugurtha. Scalig.,

Scaliger. Schill.,

Schiller.

Seneca.
Agam., Agamemnon.
Apoc., Apocolocyntosis.

Ben., De Beneficiis.
» Clem., De Clementia.

De Brev. Vit., De Brevitate Vitæ.
» Ep., Epistolæ

Herc. Fur., Hercules Furens.
Hipp., Hippolytus.
Med., Medea.

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Odyssey,

Q. Horatius Flaccus.
A. P., De Arte Poetica.
C., Carmina (Odæ).
Ep., Epistolze.

Epod., Epodi.
, S., Satire

Inscriptiones.
Gruter., Gruteri.
Just.,

Justinianus.
Inst., Institutiones.
Juv., .

Juvenal.
Lab.,.

Decius Laberius. La Bruy. or La B., La Bruyère.

Car., Caractères. La Font. or La F., La Fontaine. La Rochef. or La R., La Rochefoucauld.

» Max., Maximes. Lampr.,

Ælius Lampridius. Alex. Sev., Alexandri Severi Vita. Liv.,

T. Livius.
Lucan. or Luc.,' M. A. Lucanus.
Lucret.,

Lucretius.
Mach.,

Machiavelli, Macr.,

Macrobius, » S., Saturnalia. Manil.,

Manilius Astr., Astronomica. Mart.,

Martialis, Menand.,

Menander, Metast.,

Metastasio. Mol., .

Molière.
Nep., :

Coruelius Nepos.
Alc., Alcibiades.
Att., Atticus.
Epam., Epaniinondas.

Ham., Hamilcar.
Non.,

Nonius Marcellus, Orac. Sibyli.,

Oracula Sibyllina

Ovidius Naso.
A. A., Ars Amatoria.

Am., Amores.
, Ep., Epistolæ ex Ponto.

Fast, or F., Fasti.
Heroid. or it., Heroides.
Liv., In Liviam.

Plut., Prop.,

Rac.,

Sall.,

Sen.,

Ov.,

ABBREVIATIONS OF AUTHORS AND WORKS REFERRED TO.

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Sid.,

Varr.,

Stat., :

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Volt., Vops

Sen., Edip., Edipus.

Prov., De Providentia.
Q. N., Quæstiones Naturales.
Thyest., Thyestes.
Trang., De Tranquillitate Animi.
Truad., Troades.

Apollinaris Sidonius. sil.. Ep., Epistolæ.

Silius Italicus.
Simon. or Simonid., Simonides.
Soph.,

Sophocles.
Ant., Antigone.
Aj., Ajax.

Fragm., Fragmenta.
Spart.,

Ælius Spartianus.

Statius.
S. or Sylv., Sylvæ.
T. or Theb., Thebais.

Suetonius.
Aug., Augustus Cæsar.
Cæs., C. Julius Cæsar.
Claud., Claudius Cæsar.
De ni, Gramm., De Grammaticis.

Ner. or Neron., Nero.
Tac,,

Tacitus
A., Annales.
» Agr., agricola.
H., Historia.

Terentius.
Ad., Adelphi.
And., Andria.
Eun., Eunuchus.
Heaut., Heautontimorumenos.

Phor., Phormio.
Tert. or Tertull., Tertullus.
» Ap. or Apol., Apologia.

Coron. Mill., De Corona Militis.

Suet.,

Tert., De Fuga., De Fuga in Persecutione.

De Pudic., De Pudicitia.
Theocr,

Theocritus.
Id., idyllia.
Thuc.,

Thucydides.
Tib. or Tibull., . Tibullus.
Val. Max., .

Valerius Maximus.

Varro.
L. L., De Lingua Latina.

R. R., De Re Rustica.
Vinc. Lerin.,

S. Vincentius Lerinensis. Virg.,

Virgilius Maro.
A., Aeneis.
E , Ecloga,

G., Georgica.
Vitruv.,

Vitruvius.
Voltaire.

Flavius Vopiscus.
Vulg.,

Biblia Vulgatæ Editionis.
Cor., Epistola ad Corinthos.
Eccles., Ecclesiastes.
Ecclus.", Ecclesiasticus.
Heb., Epistola ad Hebræos.
Jer. Thren., Threni Jeremiæ.
Joan., Evangelium Joannis.
Luc., Evangelium Lucæ.
Marc., Evangelium Marci.
Matt., Evangelium Matthæi
Os., Osee.
Pet., Epistola Petri.
Prov,

Proverbia.
Ps., Psalmi.
Rom., Epistola ad Romanog.
Thess., Epistola ad Thessalonicenses.

Tim., Epistola ad Timotheum.
Xen,

Xenophon.
Mem., Memorabilia.

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Ter.,

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OTHER ABBREVIATIONS, SIGNS, ETC.

OTHER ABBREVIATIONS, SIGNS, ETC.

Log. T., Logical Term.
Loq. (Loquitur), Says.
M., Motto.
Med., Mediæval or Medical.
Mil., Military.
Op., Work, works.
Opp., Opposed to.
P., Portuguese.
Poet., Poetical.
Præf., Preface.
Prol., Prologue.
Prov., Proverb, Proverbial,-ly.
Qu., Quoted by.
Q.v., Which see.
S., Spanish.
Sc., Namely.
Sub., Understand,-stood.
S.v., Under the word,
T., Term.
Tr., Translation,-ed by.
Trop., Figuratively.
T.t., Technical term.
U.8.w., Etcetera.
Ut supra, As above.
V. (vide), See.
Viz., Namely.

Abb. or Abbrev., Abbreviated, -ation.
Ad fin., At the end.
Ap., apud, In.
Appl., Applied, Applicable to.
Cant., Canto.
Cap., Chapter.
Ct. (Confer), Compare.
Class., Classical.
E.9., For example.
Ep., Epistle,
Epil., Epilogue.
Fr., French
Fragm., Fragment.
G., German,
Gr., Greek.
Ibid., In the same place.
Id., The same.
I.e., That is.
Incert., Uncertain author or work.
Infr., Below.
Init., At the beginning.
In l., In the passage.
Introd., Introduction,
It., Italian.
K.T.N., Etcetera
L., Latin.

* signifies date of death.

? occurring after a quotation means that author, or passage (or both), are uncertain. See p. i, at the bottom, and p. viii. and note.

The first words of a quotation beginning with the end of a line of poetry are, in order to save space, frequently run on to the second line, and the commencement of the latter indicated by a capital letter, e.g., No. 16: Ab ovo Usque ad mala, which, correctly written, would run:

Ab 000
Usque ad mala.

So, also, No. 1385: En sa maison Le dos au feu, le ventre d table, is, to print it at length :

En sa maison
Le dos au feu, le ventre à table.

Quotations not found in their alphabetical place should be looked for in the Index.

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1. A aucuns les biens viennent en dormant. (Fr.) Prov.

Good fortune comes to people while they are asleep. 2. Ab abusu ad usum non valet consequentia. (L.) Law

Max.The abuse of anything is no argument against its

proper use.
3. Ab actu ad posse valet illatio. (L.)From what has

taken place we may infer what will happen.
The uniformity of nature furnishes a ground of induction, upon

which we may conclude that a similar condition of things
being given, what has happened once will happen again. În
the same way a man's habits afford presumption for the re-
currence of certain eventualities in his life. A. B. left the
turf for the stock exchange ; it is likely that he will speculate

on the one as he did on the other, ab actu ad posse, etc.
4. Ab alio expectes alteri quod feceris. (L.) P. Syr. ap. Sen.

Ep. 94.-A8 you have done to others, expect others to do to

you. Cf. Vulg. Luc. 6, 31. 5. A barbe de fol on apprend à raire. (Fr.) Prov.-Men learn

to shave by beginning on the beard of a fool. Similar to

Fiat experimentum, etc., q.v. 6. A ben conoscer la natura dei popoli, convien esser principe,

conoscer ben quella dei principi convien esser popolare. (It.) Mach. To be well acquainted with the dispositions of a people, one should be a prince; and to know well the disposition of a prince, one should be one of

the people. 7. Abends wird der Faule fleissig. (G.) Prov.- At evening the idle man is busy.

ed a

8. Abeunt studia in mores. (L.) ?-Pursuits grow into habits.

One can by habit get absorbed in what was at first most

distasteful. 9. Abi hinc in malam crucem! (L.) Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 163.

-Go and be hanged ! (2.) Abi in malam rem! Plaut.

Pers. 2, 4, 7.Go to the deuce ! 10. Abiit, excessit, evasit, erupit. (L.)

(L.) Cic. Cat. 2, 1, 1.He has departed, retreated, escaped, broken away. Said of Catiline's flight from the senate on the discovery of his

conspiracy. A good description of any one absconding. 11. Abi, ludis me, credo. (L.) Plaut. Most. 5, 1, 32.0f

with you, you are fooling me, I guess. 12. Ab initio. (L.)From the beginning. Anything which

has been irregularly done must be begun ab initio, afresh,

as though nothing had been done in the matter. 13. Ab inopia ad virtutem obsepta est via. (L.) Prov.

Poverty obstructs the road to virtue. It is so easy to be

good when one is well off. 14. Abnormis sapiens crassaque Minerva. (L.) Hor. Ep. 2,

2, 3.—Of plain good sense, untutored in the school. Full

of mother-wit. A shrewd sensible fellow. 15. A bon chat bon rat. (Fr.) Prov.-A good rat for a good

cat. Opponents should be well matched. Set a thief to catch a thief. An old poacher makes the best game

keeper. 16. Ab ovo Usque ad mala. (L.) Hor. S. 1, 3, 6.-From eggs

to apples. From the beginning to the end : eggs and
apples being respectively the first and last courses at a
Roman dinner.
The phrase applies to any topic, or speaker, monopolising the

whole of the conversation at dinner from soup to dessert, or at

any other time. 17. Abracadabra. Ancient cabalistic word of Persian origin,

said to contain the name of Mithras the sun-god. A
paper written with the letters of the spell, so as to form
an inverted pyramid, was anciently worn as an amulet
against fevers and ague, viz. :-

a bra ca d a bra
a braca da b
a bra c ad
a brac
a br

a

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