Gender, Authenticity, and the Missive Letter in Eighteenth-century France: Marie-Anne de La Tour, Rousseau's Real-life Julie

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Bucknell University Press, 2006 - History - 250 pages
"This study will particularly appeal to scholars of gender studies, but will also interest eighteenth-century specialists, reader-response critics, and any critic interested in the epistolary genre. Dr. McAlpin compares the evidence of de La Tour's authorial consciousness with that of far better known letter writers, both women (Sevigne, Graffigny, Lespinasse, Roland, Suzanne Necker) and men (Boswell, in particular). The book also introduces the exchange of letters to the English-speaking community of eighteenth-century scholars. While the de La Tour-Rousseau exchange was republished in French in 1998, it is not yet available in English. This book provides translations of the first, most significant letters in its appendix."--BOOK JACKET.
 

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Contents

Claire and Julie Write SaintPreux
27
Going Public Mme de Amie de JeanJacques
61
The Sanctity of the Readers Response EighteenthCentury Critical Assessments of the Missive Letter
100
Authenticity Devalued Contemporary Epistolary Theory
134
Postscript De La Tour James Boswell Henriette and Gender Theory
160
Appendix
186
Notes
224
Bibliography
241
Index
249
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Page 16 - ... while others are deprived of it. A private letter may well have a signer - it does not have an author; a contract may well have a guarantor - it does not have an author.

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