Page images
PDF
EPUB

INDEX

INDEX

ADDISON, JOSEPH, 53, 69, 71.
Alcott, A. Bronson, 76.
American literature, art in, 16.
See also Literature.
Amiel, Henri Frédéric, on
Renan, 65; on Cherbuliez,
188; his Journal, 229; quota-
tion from, 188.
Analogy, a frequent form of
argument, 27; between man
and nature, 27, 28, 48-50; met-
aphors, 28-31; legitimate uses
of, 31, 32; accidental and es-
sential, 32; immortality in,
32-39; in theology, 39; false
and true, 39-44; between
mind and body, 44, 45; in the
physical world, 45-47; be-
tween art and nature, 50, 54;
rhetorical and scientific, 51.
Arnold, Matthew, 34, 50, 53, 59,
70, 78, 79; as a critic, 90-92,
228; 93, 96; greatest as a lit-
erary critic, 97; his Thyrsis,
103; his aristocratic ideals,
112-114, 118; 123, 124, 133, 184,
189, 206, 210; his Literature
and Dogma, 228, 229; quota-
tions from, 53, 93.

Art, disinterestedness of, 134,
135; universality of, 135-142;
disinterestedness not indif-
ferentism in, 142-148; treat-
ment of vice and sin in, 148-
150.

[blocks in formation]

Boswell, James, his Life of
Samuel Johnson, 225.
Brontë, Charlotte, 103.
Browne, Sir Thomas, his Re-
ligio Medici, 229; on the past,
241; quotation from, 241.
Browning, Robert, 2; his How
they brought the Good News
from Ghent to Aix, 70, 166;
114, 184.
Brunetière, Ferdinand, 71, 85;
his criticism, 87; 90, 96, 104,
107, 109; a critic of the aristo
cratic type, 112, 118.
Bunting, snow (Passerina
nivalis), 174.

Burney, Fanny, 62.
Butler, Joseph, 33, 34.
Byron, Lord, 131, 141; eloquent
but not truly poetical, 165;
an example of his eloquence,
166; quotation from, 166.
Campbell, Thomas, 166: his To
the Rainbow, 166; 182.
Carlyle, Thomas, 2; his defini-
tion of poetry, 10; his criti-
cism, 89, 90; 119; his vehe.
mence and enthusiasm, 123,
124; his French Revolution,
164; 196; his service to most
readers more moral than in-
tellectual, 223; his Past and
Present, 224; his Latter-Day
Pamphlets, 224; his Life of
Sterling, 224; his essays on
Scott, Burns, and Johnson,
224; his Frederick, 224; his
Reminiscences, 224; his Sar-
tor Resartus, 224; handi-
capped by his style, 224, 225;
to Emerson on the loss of his
mother, 237; his attitude
toward the past, 238; quota-
tions from, 164, 165, 237.

Catholicism, 125.
Cats, 176.

Chateaubriand, 93.

Cherbuliez, Victor, 188.
Chickadee (Parus atricapil
lus), 173.

Cicero, quotations from, 240,

241.

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, 119.
Collins, Wilkie, 8.

Conversations with Goethe,225.
Cowley, Abraham, his essays,
220.

Criticism, the scope, aims, and
functions of, 80-84; vital
truth the important thing in,
84; personality and impres-
sionism in, 85-89; inspiration
more important than judg-
ment in, 89-92; diversity of
critical judgments, 92-95; the
inner self of the critic a ne-
cessary element in, 95, 96;
importance of the power of
expression in, 96-98; relativ-
ity of truth in, 98-100; sub-
jective and objective, 100-
104; individual taste in, 104,
105; catholicity in, 105-108;
democratic and aristocratic,
109-115; good and bad taste
in, 116-118; the doctrinaire
in, 118-126; the most produc-
tive attitude in, 127-132; pro-
fessional, 127, 128, 130; predi-
lection in, 132; antipathy in,
132, 133.
Cuckoo, European, 176, 178.

Dana, Richard Henry, Jr., his
Two Years Before the Mast,
3,226, 227.

Dante, 209.

Darwin, Charles, 211.
Defoe, Daniel, 3.
Democracy, in literature, 109-

115; modern growth of, 151,
152; its effect upon litera-
ture, 152-156.

Democratic Criticism, 109.
Demosthenes, 162.

De Quincey, Thomas, 78, 163;
his Philosophy of Roman
History, 163; 210; quotation
from, 163, 164.

Dickens, Charles, 5, 7; his Tale
of Two Cities, 225, 226; a

matchless mimic with no deep
seriousness, 225, 226.

Didacticism, 142.

Distinction, 113-115.
Dowden, Edward, 124.
Dryden, John, 92.

Earthworm, Gilbert White's
observations on, 178.

Eckermann, Johann Peter, his
Conversations with Goethe,

225.

Eliot, George, 6, 119, 121.
Eloquence, its relation to poe-
try, 161-167.
Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1, 19,
24, 27, 28; on individuality,
53, 54; 59, 76, 78, 105, 106, 119;
as a poet, 122; as a critic, 122,
123; 124, 132, 136; his Nature,
164; an example of poetic
prose from, 164; 181, 182, 184;
his appeal chiefly to youth
and early manhood, 191;
never ceased to be a clergy-
man, 192; no prosaic side,
192; his sympathy for ideas
rather than for men or
things, 193, 194; his inborn
radicalism, 194, 195; ab-
stract in his aim and con-
crete in his methods, 196;
his suggestiveness, 205; 223,
228-230, 237; his attitude
toward the past, 238; quota-
tions from, 24, 53, 54, 59, 164,
193-195.

English poetry, 165.
English writers, 7, 63.

Evans, Mary Ann (George
Eliot), 6, 119, 121.

Everett, Edward, 5.

Family tree, the, 47, 48.
Fashions, 2.

Ferguson, Charles, his Reli-
gion of Democracy, quota-
tions from, 210, 211.
Fern-owl, 175.

Fiction, values in, 6, 7; a finer
but not a greater art to-day
than formerly, 60, 61.
Fieldfare, 174.

Flaubert, Gustave, 19.
France, Anatole, 112.
Franklin, Benjamin, his Auto-
biography, 226.

Freeman, Edward Augustus, 5.
French art, 146.
French criticism, 97.
French poetry, more eloquent
than poetic, 165.

French writers, modern, 7, 63.
Froude, James Anthony, 5; his
style, 68.

George, Henry, as a writer, 9.
German writers, 7.

Gibbon, Edward, 78, 163.
Gladden, Rev. Washington, his
Art and Morality, 143, 144;
quotation from, 143.

God, the old and the new ideas
of, 152.

Goethe, Conversations with,
225.

Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von,

93, 123, 127; his Sorrows of
Young Werther, 138; 141; on
poetical and unpoetical ob-
jects, 157; on Byron, 165; 184;
quotations from, 141, 157.
Gosse, Edmund, his Questions
at Issue, 153, 154; quotation
from, 154.

Grant, Gen. Ulysses Simpson,
his Memoirs, 5, 227; an ele-
mental man, 6; his greatness
of the democratic type, 113,
114; his commonness, 115;
his lack of vanity, 227.
Gray, Thomas, 53, 103; his
Elegy in a Country Church-
yard, 137.

Greeks, the, their view of Na-
ture, 203.

Grimm, Hermann, 93.

Grouse, ruffed (Bonasa um-
bellus), 174.

Guizot, François Pierre Guil-
laume, 119.

[blocks in formation]

most suggestive of our ro-
mancers, 205.
Heine, Heinrich, 80.

Hennequin, his Scientific Crit-
icism, 109.
Heronry, 177.

Hewlett, Maurice, 25, 26; quo-
tation from, 25.
Higginson,

worth, 72.

Thomas Went-

Holmes, Oliver Wendell, 47,
79; his Old Ironsides, 166;
his Autocrat of the Break-
fast-Table, 219; his real ideas
and sham ideas, 219; his lack
of deep seriousness, 220.
Honey dew, 178.
Howells, William Dean, 5, 7,
72,81; his Criticism and Fic
tion, 82, 83, 109; 206; quota-
tion from, 83.

Hugo, Victor, 103, 119; his
moral earnestness, 189.
Hume, David, elegance of his
style, 77; on the eloquence of
Demosthenes, 162; on Cow-
ley and Parnell, 220; quota-
tions from, 77, 162.

Hunt, Leigh, 131.

Huxley, Thomas Henry, 51, 78,
119.

[blocks in formation]
« PreviousContinue »