Worthies of Buckinghamshire and Men of Note of that County

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Page 311 - This Book of Articles before rehearsed is again approved, and allowed to be holden and executed within the realm, by the assent and consent of our Sovereign Lady Elizabeth, by the Grace of God, of England, France, and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the Faith, &c.
Page 147 - I modestly but freely told him : and after some further discourse about it, I pleasantly said to him, Thou hast said much here of paradise lost, but what hast thou to say of paradise found...
Page 147 - After some common discourses had passed between us, he called for a manuscript of his ; which being brought he delivered to me, bidding me take it home with me, and read it at my leisure ; and when I had so done, return it to him with my judgment thereupon. When I came home, and had set myself to read it, I found it was that excellent poem which he entitled
Page 147 - This is owing to you, for you put it into my head by the question you put to me at Chalfont, which before I had not thought of.
Page 81 - House of Parliament, whose trust he has betrayed. I impeach him in the name of the English nation, whose ancient honor he has sullied.
Page 34 - I have begun several times many things, and I have often succeeded at last. I shall sit down now ; but the time will come when you will hear me.
Page 37 - The country will draw its moral. For my part, if we are to have free trade, I, who honour genius, prefer that such measures should be proposed by the honourable member for Stockport, than by one who, through skilful Parliamentary manoeuvres, has tampered with the generous confidence of a great people and of a great party.
Page 147 - . After I had, with the best attention, read it through, I made him another visit, and returned him his book, with due acknowledgment of the favour he had done me in communicating it to me. He asked me how I liked it and what I thought of it, which I modestly but freely told him, and after some further discourse about it, I pleasantly said to him, " Thou hast said much here of
Page 409 - Wilkes, esq. herewith sent you, for being the author and publisher of a most infamous and seditious libel, intitled, The North Briton, No. 45, tending to inflame the minds and alienate the affections of the people from his majesty, and to excite them to traitorous insurrections against the government...
Page 125 - Cooper's Hill is the work that confers upon him the rank and dignity of an original author. He seems to have been, at least among us, the author of a species of composition that may be denominated local poetry, of which the fundamental subject is some particular landscape, to be poetically described with the addition of such embellishments as may be supplied by historical retrospection, or incidental meditation.

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