Voyage to South America, Volume 2

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John Miller, Burlington Arcade, 1820 - Argentina
 

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Page 270 - Westward the course of empire takes its way ; The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day : Time's noblest offspring is the last.
Page 253 - Tis liberty alone that gives the flower Of fleeting life its lustre and perfume ; And we are weeds without it. All constraint, Except what wisdom lays on evil men, Is evil...
Page 38 - The sentiments I entertain with regard to that object have been long since in your knowledge; but I could personally have no participation in it, unless patronized by the government of this country. It was my wish that matters had been ripened for a co-operation in the course of this fall, on the part of this country; but this can now scarce be the case.
Page 297 - ... lost fifteen hundred men. Memory is horror-struck in recalling the abominable cruelties then perpetrated by Goyeneche in Cochabamba. Would to God it were possible to forget this ungrateful American, who, on the day of his entrance into the city, ordered the respectable...
Page 297 - Bourbon preceded all the acts of the government, and headed its public documents. — The Spanish flag waved on our vessels, and served to animate our soldiers. The provinces, seeing themselves reduced to a kind of orphanage by the dispersion of the national government, by the want of another of a legitimate character, and capable of commanding...
Page 302 - ... afflictions, such as these, that we have been compelled to take the only course that remained to us. We reflected deeply on our situation, and future • fate, and turning our eyes to every quarter, we were unable to see any thing but the three elements, of which it must necessarily be composed, opprobrium, ruin, and abject submission.
Page 39 - The plan in my opinion ought to be — a fleet of Great Britain, an army of the United States, a government for the liberated territory agreeable to both the co-operators, about which there will be no difficulty. To arrange the plan a competent authority from Great Britain to some person here, is the best expedient. Your presence here will, in this case, be extremely essential. We are raising an army of about twelve thousand men. General Washington has resumed his station at the head of our armies....
Page 302 - Gamar£O in the same manner, cut off his head, and sent it as a present to General Pezuela, informing him that it was a miracle of the Virgen del Carmen. It has been by a torrent of evils and bitter afflictions such as these that we have been compelled to take the only course that remained to us. We reflected deeply on our situation and future fate, and. turning our eyes to every quarter, we were unable to see anything but the three elements of which it must necessarily be composed — oppro:>rium.
Page 294 - ... principles of anarchy and sedition imputed to us. At that time we had abundant cause for doing what we have since done. It was by no means our duty to be indifferent to the state of degradation in which we had so long existed. If at any time victory authorizes the conqueror to be the arbiter of his own destinies, we might justly then have fixed ours; we were, with arms in our hands, triumphant, and there was not a single Spanish regiment to oppose us; and if neither victory nor force can give...
Page 294 - A favorable occasion then presented itself to free ourselves from so many vexations, but we did not seize it; on the contrary, we exerted ourselves in her defence, arming in her cause alone, and with a view of maintaining our connexion with her. Without having any concern in her differences with European nations, we have embarked in her wars ; we have suffered the devastations ; we...

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