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Shipping Prices of Sherry, Duty per Butt, and Quantity shipped to

Great Britain, from 1787 to 1863.

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€ 17

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24 to 40
24 40
24 40
24

40
24 40
24 44
24 46
24 46
24 46
23 52
23 52
23 52
21
21 48
25 48
24 48
26 48
28 48
26 48
27 44
27 44
27 44
30 50
38 60
40 70
45
45

1787 1788 1789 1790 1791 1792 1793 1794 1795 1796 1797 1798 1799 1800 1801 1802 1803 1804 1805 1806 1807 1808 1809 1810 1811 1812 1813

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65

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8,432 9,402 7,998 9,736 13,038 10,790

8,726 12,320 16,176 12,184 4,518 7,142 13,352 16,708 12,670 10,740 13,742 13,292 18,786 16,528 15,280 23,972 21,878 20,336

9,082 16,136 Custom House burned 11,270 10,296 6,784 9,592 13,870 8,726 8,604 8,572 10,950 15,564 18,800

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€ 30 to 65 26 26,489 33 63

22,736 31 60

23,395 30 60

30,657 31 65

27,327 30 65

24,127 31

65 30 25,021 30 65

23,519 30 65

32,390 31 70

33,138 31 75

35,885 31 65

30,429 30 65

27,332 31 70

32,460 31 65

39,719 31

38,676 31 65

30,810 25 90

25,887 22 90

25,469 25 80

33,141 22 60

33,697 31 65

30,907 28 75

32,799 31 70

25,952 28 70

31,829 28 70

35,433 31 80

36,157 28 80

29,461 24 90

36,233 24 70

41,251 36 85

35,759 36 85

37,415 36 85

42,860 36 120

22,781 36 150

33,605 40 150 311. & 161. 48. 49,314

200 131. ls. 50,052 40 200 131.1s. 132.108. 52,876 40 250 131, 108.

66,321

1825 1826 1827 1828 1829 1830 1831 1832 1833 1834 1835 1836 1837 1838 1839 1840 1841 1842 1843 1844 1845 1846 1847 1848 1849 1850 1851 1852 1853 1854 1855 1856 1857 1858 1859 1860 1861 1862 1863

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9

CHAPTER V.

SOUTH-EAST OF SPAIN, BARCELONA, ETC.

Gibraltar—Sir Day Wilkie-Smuggling-Malaga--Old Mountain

Almeria-Carthagena–The Old Guide—Pobre España-Alicante - Valencia-Barcelona-Custom House - Burning and DancingTarragona—Old Rancio—Catalonia—Marseilles-Saguntum.

ON visiting the wine districts of Spain and Portugal,

many victories.

in 1844, I returned home from Xerez by Seville, Madrid, Vittoria, Irun, Bayonne, and Bordeauxthe mail being escorted out of Madrid by three dragoons, to Buitragro, not far from Vittoria, where Wellington gained one of his

During my former visit, in 1841, I steamed from Cadiz to Gibraltar, where I had to remain during two days on that wonderful rock; and it is scarcely less wonderful to think that we hold a portion of the land of the Spaniards. While at the signal station, the very highest point, looking through the old sergeant's glass at the houses and hills in Africa, we were surprised to see the English steamer, which had left on her way home two hours previously, turning round and coming back to the rock.

We soon learned that this was caused by the death of Sir David Wilkie, on his return from Egypt.

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The governor was applied to, to allow his body to be landed and buried; but Gibraltar being a fortification, and ships from Alexandria being then under quarantine, permission could not be granted ; and the body therefore was consigned to the deep, as represented in Turner's well-known painting.

Almost the sole trade of Gibraltar is smuggling, a business very efficiently protected by our ships and the guns of the fort, which are brought to bear upon any Spanish guarda costa that ventures within three miles of them. At that time, there was great excitement and correspondence relative to a Spanish cruiser, which, after having chased a smuggler, overtook her within the prescribed three miles, and carried her off to Carthagena ; but no sooner was this known, than an English brig-of-war was despatched, with orders to enter Carthagena, and to bring the smuggler back to her protectors. The chagrin of the people of Carthagena may be imagined on seeing this done ; nor can we wonder that Spanish pride was roused against those daring Ingleses.

Leaving Gibraltar at night, accompanied by half a dozen handsome smuggling boats, designed for various parts of the coast, we reached Malaga the next morning at six ; and I had the pleasure of being useful to the well-known blind traveller, Lieutenant Holman, who was then travelling through Spain that he might describe its beauties. It was evident that all his descriptions were founded upon answers to his numerous questions.

It is impossible to overrate the beauty of the position of Malaga, surrounded by luxuriant hills, and the snow-covered Sierra Nevada rising to the skies, with ranges of mountains extending as far as the eye can reach.

But, revenons à nos moutons, Malaga wines. As usual, I introduced myself to the principal winemerchants, and invariably met with a courteous reception. I was shown the cellars of two or three, but would have been sorry to have drunk a pint of any wine I tasted there; they were all heavy, coarse, and ill-made. The only tolerable quality was that which was destined for transmission to Cadiz, to be there mixed with the thin, so-called, sherries.

I saw some of the dark old mountain,' which used to be well known as a forenoon or liqueur wine ; but may be said to be now entirely forgotten.

I remember well, when a boy, hearing the word mountain in constant use, and on reference to old shipping lists I see it regularly quoted. I see one dated 1805, with the following quotations, per butt, free on board at Malaga, 1803, 151. 10s. ; 1802,161. 58.; 1801, 171. 58.; 1800, 171. 15s.; 1799, 181. 108. ; 1798, 201. 58.; 1797, 21l.; 1796, 21l. 158.; 1795, 221. 10s. ; 1794, 231. 10s. ; 1793, 241. 10s.

One cannot help remarking, and being surprised by the slight difference in the prices in former years. It is seen here to be only about a pound per annum, which seems unaccountable with twelve months' interest, and loss from leakage and evaporation.

ALMERIA-CARTHAGENA.

239

The very circumstance of the grapes grown here being so excellent, is a proof that, if the making of wine were found as profitable as the sale of grapes, very fine wine would be produced. I do not mean, because the grapes are so large and fine—for it is a fact that large, fine-eating grapes invariably produce inferior wine—but it is because the soil, the heat, and the aspect of the various hills, are so admirably adapted for wine, that the result might be looked upon as certain. At the table d'hôte, both the white and red kinds were new, and coarse.

The next day, I passed in Almeria, famous for its grapes, but I could not hear of a wine-merchant. It is a small miserable place; but it is said that when the Moors were driven out of Spain by the Spaniards, many fled hither on their way to Africa, and, not being able to get away, were allowed to remain. I can well believe this, for the inhabitants are wildlooking beings, with black sparkling eyes, very little clothing, and are in the habit of sitting cross-legged on the ground. Few of the windows are glazed, and the roofs are flat, as in Eastern countries.

From Almeria we steamed—as usual, during the night—to Carthagena. There is this great comfort in the Mediterranean that one is not troubled about the tide serving ;' the ebb and flow being almost imperceptible.

All that can be seen of Carthagena, until you are alongside the houses, are forts in the rocks on each side of a narrow entrance, through which you pass

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