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and, taking off my hat, made him a low bow, which had the desired effect, for he put down his rifle and beckoned to me to move off. I obeyed his order with the utmost alacrity : I only wish I could now get over six-foot walls half as speedily as I did on that occasion. I learned afterwards that the building which I had observed in the field was a powder magazine, over which the soldier was sentry.

Becoming tired of waiting in Oporto, I had decided on riding with a guide to Vigo, to meet the steamer on her calling there; but just as I was setting off, the flag announcing that she was in sight made me give up the land journey, and hurry down to the Foz; where I was informed the mail boat would embark the passengers for Lisbon at a place on the shore about two miles from the mouth of the river. This point, called the Rocks, forms a projecting pier from which it is safe to communicate with passing ships, unless the sea be very rough.

While waiting, I wandered about the little town, and had an opportunity of learning practically the truth of the old adage, that you should never interfere in the quarrels of man and wife.

Passing along a narrow street, I heard loud voices, and the screams of a woman issuing from a house, the door of which being open, I entered, and there saw a man in a fearful passion, holding his wife by the hair and beating her, while she resisted

A WIFE'S INGRATITUDE.

191

.

vigorously. I hesitated for a moment whether it were not best to let them fight it out; but gallantry overcoming prudence, I watched till the man's back was towards me, when I rushed in, seized him by the throat à la garrotte, and, placing my knee to the small of his back, held him so that he could not move. Flattering myself that the lady would feel the deepest gratitude, I looked to her for approbation, when, to my dismay, she cast upon me a look of fury; and seeing her clench her hands, I thought it was time to be off, so, giving her beloved a push into her arms, I rushed out of the door, scarcely halting till I found myself in the boat, protected from the sweet pair by twelve stout rowers. They soon put me on board the steamer Iberia, which landed me the next morning in Lisbon.

» 1851,

ور

Although shown in the general statistical tables, I insert here the consumption of port since 1831, and the percentage which it bore to all other kinds. In 1831, consumption 2,707,734 gallons, 43.58 per cent. 1841, 2,387,017

38:59 2,524,775

40:20 » 1859,

2,020,561

27.82 1,776,138

24:14
2,702,649

25.06
1862,
2,349,945

23.97
2,618,680

24.99 There are also tables marked A, and B, both of which I have prefaced with a few explanatory remarks.

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» 1860, » 1861,

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,1863 وو

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This shows the shipping prices at Oporto, the number of pipes shipped to

England, and the amount of duty on a pipe in each year, from 1787 to 1863. Wines have been shipped at much lower prices than the quotations, but these represent the circulars of the principal firms, for the qualities to which they attach their bran.is.

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£ 18

£ 28

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32

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28

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39
40

9

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99

1787 1788 1789 1790 1791 1792 1793 1794 1795 1796 1797 1798 1799 1800 1801 1802 1803 1804 1806 1806 1807 1808 1809 1810 1811 1812 1813

£
16 to 20
16 20
16 20
16 20
20 24
20 24
20 24
20 24
19 22
22 30
22 30
22 30
22 30
22 30
22 30
22 30
34 38
32 34
32 34
32 34
32 34
32 34
32 34
32 34
40 70
40 70
40 70

£ L
36 to 42
36 46
30 40
30 50
30
32 50
26 48
26 54
28 58
32 48
38 48
30 46
22 44
26 48
24 50
24 42
24 42
26 42
26 42
28 50
24 46
24 50
22 42
22 42
25 48
28 48
30 48

33

47 52

32,174 1826 36,087 1827 39,678 1828 42,862 1829 47,212 1830 54,981 1831 31,194 1832 50,002 1833 52,763 1834 37,626 1835 22,340 1836 54,801 1837 52,783 1838 54,203 1839 64,859 1840 37,051 1841 62,947 1842 19,698 1843 40,006 1844 39,696 1845 47,828 1846 44,186 1817 41,156 1818 54,720 1819 18,520 1850

30,014 1851
Custom House 1852

burned
30,996 1853
31,641 1854
16,430 1855
28,250 1856
35,888 1857
20,622 1858
21,196 1859
23,394 1860
27,758 1861
23,208 1862
19,992 1863
40,322

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18,548 24,549 26,164 17,981 19,038 20,213 24,025 22,760 24,177 24,174 25,029 22,376 25, 221 25,464 23,205 20,757 11,208 21,893 25,109 23,383 23,477 20,529 21,277 23,028 25,400 20,780 19,219 46,834 33,831 26,755 29,216 23,615 11,592 14,530 22,424 22,945 24,832 30,044

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The shipments during the first six months of 1864 have been 18,270, so that if the same is continued till December 31 ; they will have amounted to 36,540 pipes during the twelve months.

CHAPTER III.

LISBON AND LISBON WINE.

Lisbon-Belem-Charley'Napier-Don Miguel-Don Pedro-Espoz

y Mina-O'Connell—Sacavem—Calcavellos — Arinto— TermoColares—Lavradio-Bucellas-Cintra-A Bottle of Colares-Conde de Piedade-St. Ubes—Estramadura—Memorandum of TastingLetter from Lisbon in 1806.

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ISBON !—what a change has taken place in the

importation of wines from that place! It may be seen in my remarks upon port, that a large portion of the shipments from Portugal were formerly from this district; and some idea may be formed of the extent of that trade by the perusal of the following letter dated in 1798.

I have also mentioned that about the same period it was the daily habit, among City men, to go to Toin's, or some other coffee-room, to have bread and cheese and a gill of lisbon, as it is now to go to Garraway's for a sandwich and a glass of sherry. Old wine merchants will remember when constant orders used to be received for lisbon ; while now they do not probably receive one in six monthis.

It shows how fashions unaccountably change ; for there is scarcely a better or more agreeable wine than real, old, rich, mellow, or dry lisbon ; but its

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name is nearly forgotten, since nothing passes now that has not the name of sherry, however coarse much of this is, and not to be compared to good lisbon. With the exception of an order for a quarter-cask, some months ago, I have not been asked for it for years past, while among our forefathers it was the favourite white wine. The city of Lisbon was at one time second only to London for commerce; but this has dwindled away, and it is melancholy to look on its splendid houses and streets, showing what it was in former times, and the still existing remains of churches and palaces, rent by the earthquake of 1756.

On passing the fort of Belem, we came upon a view of the town and its precipitous streets, varied by numerous churches and spires, all glittering in a brilliant morning sun. The sight, as we passed Belem, reminded me of the late • Charley’ Napier, who dined with me the day before he set off on his daring resolution to take Don Miguel's fleet. With several active supporters of Don Pedro, there was the Spanish guerilla chief, Espoz y Mina, so renowned in the old Spanish War, and so denounced at a later period by O'Connell, for shooting the mother of Cabrera.

Napier was a slovenly-looking man: his trousers, for instance, had been once white, but were now very old and yellow-looking. He was fond of saying eccentric things, and of pretending to be in a great passion, while it was evident he was merely affecting

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