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ADVERTISEMENT.

TO PERSONS WHO HAVE RESIDED IN THE

GEORGIAN OR SOCIETY ISLANDS.

The writer of this Narrative will feel grateful for notice of any erroneous statements, which (in spite of great care) may have been made ; as well as for additional details which any person may be disposed kindly to communicate through the publisher.

THE NIGHT OF TOIL.

CHAPTER I.

1796.

WHY THE DUFF LEFT ENGLAND.

On the other side of this earth there is an immense tract of water, called the South Seas. It is sprinkled with islands, as the grass is dotted with flowers in spring, or the sky is adorned with stars on a dark night.

I am going to give an account of one of these islands called Ta-hi-ti,* and I shall speak a little of some other islands that lie near it.

* The name of the island is pronounced as if spelt thus Tah-hee-tee. The vowels in Tahitian names are called like those in French. The English a is pronounced

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DISCOVERY OF TAHITI.

Tahiti was first seen by an English captain called Wallis in the year 1767. At that time George the Third (the grandfather of our Queen Victoria) was King of England. There are a few islands near Tahiti ; and this little cluster of islands is called the Georgian Islands, after King George.

Tahiti is a most beautiful place. In the midst mountains rise that reach the clouds, thick groves grow almost close to the shore, and clear streams run down the mountain sides into the sea.

It is always summer there, while fresh sea-breezes make the air pleasant.

You will desire to know what kind of people lived in this pleasant island when Captain Wallis discovered it.

The inhabitants were tall and stout, with brown skins, dark eyes, and glossy black hair. They appeared merry and good-natured, and were generally laughing and playing.

When Captain Wallis returned to England, and described the islands of the South Seas, a great many people wished to see them. Other ships paid visits to Tahiti, and brought back more accounts of it, of the fine fruittrees that grew there, and of the pleasant lite the inhabitants led. There were some persons, however, who read these accounts with great sorrow. You are surprised to hear that any people were sorry to hear of so delightful

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