Romola, Volumes 1-2

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Bernhard Tauchnitz, 1863 - Florence (Italy) - 375 pages

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Page 271 - And behold I, even I, do bring a flood of waters upon the earth to destroy all flesh wherein is the breath of life from under heaven, and every thing that is in the earth shall die, but with thee will I establish My Covenant, and thou shalt come into the ark, thou and thy sons and thy wife, and thy sons
Page 70 - Our lives make a moral tradition for our individual selves, as the life of mankind at large makes a moral tradition for the race ; and to have once acted nobly seems a reason why we should always be noble. But Tito was feeling the effect of an opposite tradition : he had won no memories of self-conquest and perfect faithfulness from which he could have a sense of falling.
Page 298 - Smite the lintel of the door, that the posts may shake: and cut them in the head, all of them ; and I will slay the last of them with the sword: he that fleeth of them shall not flee away, and he that escapeth of them shall not be delivered.
Page 372 - There was a man to whom I was very near, so that I could see a great deal of his life, who made almost every one fond of him, for he was young, and clever, and beautiful, and his manners to all were gentle and kind. I believe, when I first knew him, he never thought of anything cruel or base. But because he tried to slip away from everything that was unpleasant, and cared for nothing else so much as his own safety, he came at last to commit some of the basest deeds — such as make men infamous....
Page 292 - Now that the first shock, which had called up the traitorous signs of fear, was well past, he hoped to be prepared for all emergencies by cool deceit — and defensive armour. It was a characteristic fact in Tito's experience at this crisis that no direct measures for ridding himself of Baldassarre ever occurred to him. All other possibilities passed through his mind, even to his own flight from Florence ; but he never thought of any scheme for removing his enemy. His dread generated no active malignity,...
Page 371 - There are so many things wrong and difficult in the world, that no man can be great — he can hardly keep himself from wickedness — unless he gives up thinking much about pleasures or rewards, and gets strength to endure what is hard and painful.
Page 291 - Tito was experiencing that inexorable law of human souls, that we prepare ourselves for sudden deeds by the reiterated choice of good or evil which gradually determines character.
Page 372 - I will tell you something, Lillo." Romola paused a moment. She had taken Lillo's cheeks between her hands, and his young eyes were meeting hers. "There was a man to whom I was very near, so that I could see a great deal of his life, who made almost every one fond of him, for he was young, and clever, and beautiful, and his manners to all were gentle and kind. I believe when I first knew him, he never thought of anything cruel or base. But because he tried to slip away from everything that was unpleasant,...
Page 362 - There is no jot of worthy evidence that from the time of his imprisonment to the supreme moment, Savonarola thought or spoke of himself as a martyr. The idea of martyrdom had been to him a passion dividing the dream of the future with the triumph of beholding his work achieved. And now, in place of both, had come a resignation which he called by no glorifying name. But therefore he may the more fitly be called a martyr by his fellow-men to all time. For power rose against him not because of his sins,...
Page 343 - If everything else is doubtful, this suffering that I can help is certain; if the glory of the cross is an illusion, the sorrow is only the trner. While the strength is in my arm I will stretch it out to the fainting ; while the light visits my eyes they shall seek the forsaken.

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