Abridgment of Mental Philosophy: Including the Three Departments of the Intellect, Sensibilities, and Will : Designed as a Text-book for Academies and High Schools

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Harper & Brothers, 1869 - Intellect - 564 pages
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Contents

Of certain indefinite feelings sometimes ascribed to the touch
44
Relation between the sensation and what is outwardly signified
45
CHAPTER VI
46
Statement of the mode or process in visual perception
47
Of the original and acquired perceptions of sight
48
The idea of extension not originally from sight
49
Of the knowledge of the figure of bodies by the sight
50
Illustration of the subject from the blind
51
Measurements of magnitude by the
52
Of objects seen in a mist 41 Of the sun and moon when seen in the horizon
53
Of the estimation of distances by sight
54
Signs by means of which we estimate distance by sight
55
Estimation of distance when unaided by intermediate objects
56
Of objects seen on the ocean
57
CHAPTER VII
58
Of habit in relation to the smell
59
Of habit in relation to the taste
60
Of habit in relation to the hearing
62
Application of habit to the touch
64
Other striking instances of habits of touch
65
Habits considered in relation to the sight
66
Sensations may possess a relative as well as positive increase of CHAPTER VIII
68
Of habits as modified by particular callings and arts
69
The law of habit considered in reference to the perception of the outlines and forms of objects
70
Notice of some facts which favour the above doctrine
71
Additional illustrations of Mr Stewarts doctrine
72
Meaning and characteristics of conceptions
73
Of conceptions of objects of sight
74
Of the influence of habit on our conceptions
76
Influence of habit on conceptions of sight 63 Of the subserviency of our conceptions to description
77
Of conceptions attended with a momentary belief
78
Conceptions which are joined with perceptions
81
CHAPTER IX
83
Nature and characteristics of simple mental states ib 69 Simple mental states not susceptible of definition
84
Simple mental states representative of a reality
85
Origin of complex notions and their relation to simple
86
gs
87
The precise sense in which complexness is to be understood
88
Illustrations of analysis as applied to the mind
89
Complex notions of external origin
90
Of objects contemplated as wholes
91
CHAPTER X
92
Abstraction implied in the analysis of complex ideas 37388548828
94
General abstract notions the same with genera and species
95
Process in classification or the forming of genera and species
96
Early classifications sometimes incorrect 83 Illustrations of our earliest classifications
97
Of the nature of general abstract ideas
98
The power of general abstraction in connexion with numbers c
99
Of the speculations of philosophers and others
100
CHAPTER XI
101
Of different degrees of attention
102
Dependence of memory on attention
103
Of exercising attention in reading
104
Alleged inability to command the attentior
105
CHAPTER XII
107
Dreams are often caused by our sensations
108
Explanation of the incoherency of dreams 1st cause
110
Apparent reality of dreams 1st cause
111
Apparent reality of dreams 2d cause
112
Of our estimate of time in dreaming
113
Explanation of the preceding statements
114
PART II
117
CHAPTER I
119
Declaration of Locke that the soul has knowdge in itself
120
There may also be internal accessions to knowledge
121
Instances of notions which have an internal origin 107 Other instances of ideas which have an internal origin
122
CHAPTER II
123
Ideas of existence mind selfexistence and personal identity
124
Of the nature of inity and the origin of that notion 111 Nature of succession and origin of the idea of succession
127
Origin of the notion of duration 113 Illustrations of the nature of duration
128
Of time and its measurements and of eternity
129
The idea of space not of external origin
130
The idea of space has its origin in suggestion
131
Of the origin of the idea of power 118 Occasions of the origin of the idea of power
132
Of the ideas of right and wrong
133
Origin of the ideas of moral merit and demerit
134
Of other elements of knowledge developed suggestion 122 Suggestion a source of principles as well as of ideas
135
CHAPTER III
136
CHAPTER IV
140
Occasions on which feelings of relation may arise
141
Of the use of correlative terms 130 Of relations of identity and diversity
142
11 Relations of degree and names expressive of them
143
111 Of relations of proportion
144
v Of relations of place or position
145
v Of relations of time
146
v Of ideas of possession
147
VII Of relations of cause and effect
148
Of complex terms involving the relation of cause and effect
149
Connexion of relative suggestion with reasoning
150
CHAPTER V
151
Of the general laws of association
152
Resemblance the first general law of association
153
Of resemblance in the effects produced
154
Contrast the second general or primary
155
Contiguity the third general or primary
157
Cause and effect the fourth primary
158
ALSOCIATION II SECONDARY LAWS Bection 147 Secondary laws and their connexion with the primary
159
Of the influence of lapse of time
160
Secondary law of repetition or habit
161
Of the secondary law of coexistent emotion
162
Original difference in the mental constitution
163
The foregoing as applicable to the sensibilities CHAPTER VII
166
Of memory as a ground or law of belief
167
Of differences in the strength of memory
168
Of circumstantial memory or that species of memory which is based on the relations of contiguity in time and place
169
Illustrations of specific or circumstantial memory
170
Of philosophic memory or that species of memory which is based on other relations than those of contiguity
171
Illustrations of philosophic memory
172
Of that species of memory called intentional recollection
173
Nature of intentional recollection
174
Marks of a good memory
175
Directions or rules for the improvement of the memory
177
Further directions for the improvement of the memory
179
Of observance of the truth in connexion with memory CHAPTER IX
180
Of differences the power of reasoning CHAPTER VIII
181
Mental action quickened by influence on the physical system 169 Other instances of quickened mental action and of a restoration of thoughts 170 Ef...
184
Approval and illustrations of these views from Coleridge
185
Application of the principles of this chapter to education
187
Connexion of this doctrine with the final judgment and a future life
189
REASONING
190
Definition of reasoning and of propositions
191
Process of the mind in all cases of reasoning
192
Illustration of the preceding statement
193
Grounds of the selection of propositions
194
Reasoning implies the existence of antecedent or assumed propo sitions
195
Of habits of reasoning
198
Of reasoning in connexion with language or expression
199
Illustration of the foregoing section 166
200
Section Pagt 185 Of the subjects of demonstrative reasoning
201
Use of definitions and axioms in demonstrative reasoning
202
The opposites of demonstrative reasonings absurd
203
Demonstrations do not admit of different degrees of belief
204
Of the use of liagrams in demonstrations
205
CHAPTER XI
206
Of the nature of moral certainty
207
Of reasoning from analogy
208
Of reasoning by induction
209
Of combined or accumulated arguments
210
CHAPTER XII
211
Care to be used in correctly stating the subject of discussion 2
212
Consider the kind of evidence applicable to the subject
213
Fallacia equivocationis or the use of equivocal terms and phrases
215
Grounds of the preference of one conception to another
224
Illustration of the subject from Milton 22
225
Illustration of the statements of the preceding section
227
On the utility of the faculty of the imagination
228
Importance of the imagination in connexion with reasoning
229
CHAPTER XIV
231
Of excited conceptions and of apparitions in general
232
Of the less permament excited conceptions of sound
234
First cause of permanently vivid conceptions or apparitions Morbid sensibility of the retina of the eye
235
Methods of relief adopted in this case
239
Of disordered or alienated sensations
245
Illustrations of this mental disorder
251
Characteristics of emotions of beauty
252
Of what is meant by beautiful objects
253
Of the distinction between beautiful and other of ects
254
Grounds or occasions of emotions of beauty various
255
All objects not equally fitted to cause these emotions
256
A susceptibility of emotions of beauty an ultimate principle of our mental constitution
257
Remarks on the beauty of forms The circle
258
THE SENSIBILITIES
259
Of the beauty of straight and angular forms
260
Of square pyramidal and triangular forms
261
Of the original or intrinsic beauty of colours
262
Further illustrations of the original beauty of colours
263
Of sounds considered as a source of beauty
264
Classification of the natural sensibilities
265
Further instances of the original beauty of sounds
266
CHAPTER IV
269
Connexion between beauty and sublimity
276
The occasions of the emotions of sublimity various
277
Great extent or expansion an occasion of sublimity
278
Conceptions as conrected with fictitious representations
279
Of depth in connexion with the sublime
280
Of colours in connexion with the sublime
281
CHAPTER III
293
Objects may become beautiful by association merely
294
Further illustrations of associated feelings
295
Instances of national associations
297
The sources of associated beauty coincident with those of human happiness
298
Summary of views in regard to the beautiful
299
Of sounds as furnishing an occasion of sublime emotions 283 Of motion in connexion with the sublime
305
Indications of power accompanied by emotions of the sublime
306
Of the original or primary sublimity of objects 286 Considerations in proof of the original sublimity of objects
307
Influence of association on emotions of sublimity
308
CHAPTER V
309
Gezeral nature of emo ons of the ludicrous 289 Occasions of emotions of the ludicrous
310
Of what is understood by wit 291 Of wit as it consists in burlesque or in debasing objects
311
of wit when employed in aggrandizing objects
312
Of the character and occasions of humour
313
Of the practical utility of feelings of the ludicrous
314
NATURE OF DESIRES
321
The principles based upon desire susceptible of a twofold
327
PROPENSITIES
336
Section Pagi 328 Of the na ura desire of esteem
341
Of the desire of esteem as a rule of conduct
345
Of the desire of possession
346
Of the moral character of the possessory principie
347
Of perversions of the possessory desire
348
Of the desire of power
349
Of the moral character of the desire of power
350
Propensity of selflove or the desire of happiness
351
Of selfishness as distinguished from selflove
352
Reference to the opinions of philosophical writers
353
The principle of sociality original in the human mind
354
Evidence of the existence of this principle of sociality
355
340
356
Relation of the social principle to civil society
357
CHAPTER V
358
Of the complex nature of the affections
359
Of resentment or anger
360
Illustrations of instinctive resentment
361
Of voluntary in distinction from instinctive resentment
362
Tendency of anger to excess and the natural checks to it
363
Other reasons for checking and subduing the angry passions
365
Modifications of resentment Peevishness
366
Modifications of resentment Envy
367
Modifications of resentment Jealousy
368
Modifications of resentment Revenge
369
CHAPTER VI
371
Love in its various forms characterized by a twofold action
372
Illustrations of the strength of the parental affection
374
Of the filial affection
375
The filial affection original or implanted
376
Illustrations of the filial affection
377
168
379
On the utility of the domestic affections
380
Of the moral character of the domestic affections and of the be nevolent affections generally
381
Of the moral character of the voluntary exercises of the benevo lent affections
382
Of the connexion between benevolence and rectitude
383
Of humanity or the love of the human race
384
Further proofs in support of the doctrine of an innate humanity or love for the human race
386
Proofs cf a humane or philanthropic principle from the existence of benevolent institutions
387
Other remarks in proof of the same doctrine
388
Of patriotism or love of country
389
Of the affection of friendship
390
Of the affection of pity or sympathy
391
Of the moral character of pity
392
Of the affection of gratitude
394
fectior Page
395
Further illustrations of the results of the absence of this principle
401
Feelings of ob igation have particular reference to the future
407
Of the origin of secondary active principles 498
408
Classification of the moral sensibilities
414
Of the close connexion between conscience and reasoning
420
Further proof from language and literature
426
Feelings of obligation subsequent in time to the moral emotions
431
Influence of early associations on moral judgments
440
Of the importance in a moral point of view of adopting correct
446
433
458
439
464
Of sudden and strong impulses of the mind
467
174
468
444
471
Disordered action of the passion of fear
473
VOLITIONS OR VOLITIONAL STATES OF MIND
481
Of the disordered and alienated action of the appetites
483
Volitions involve a prospective element
488
LAWS OF THE WILL IMPLIED IN THE PRESCIENCE OR FORESIGHT
493
Prescience of men in respect to their own situation
499
CHAPTER V
505
Proof of freedom from feelings of remorse
511
483
514
Both views are to be fully received
517
488
520
Illustration of the subject from the command of temper
523
Page
527
32
4
42
6
47 48 49 50 51 52 53 ib 54 55 56 57 AAROCI33 83 272
7
60 62 64 65 6 68 69 70
8
ib 78 81
9
ib 129 130 131
13
Consciousness the 2d source of internal knowledge its nature 136
14
ib 152 153 154 155 157 158
164
184 ib 185
197
200
269
284 293 294
ib 303 304 ib 305 308 307 b 308 309
ib 312 313 314

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Page 308 - AND I saw another mighty angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud : and a rainbow was upon his head, and his face was as it were the sun, and his feet as pillars of fire...
Page 305 - The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the Lord is upon many waters.
Page 103 - The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended ; and, I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren.
Page 120 - Secondly, the other fountain from which experience furnisheth the understanding with ideas is, —the perception of the operations of our own mind within us, as it is employed about the ideas it has got; —which operations, when the soul comes to reflect on and consider, do furnish the understanding with another set of ideas, which could not be had from things without.
Page 491 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 242 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee : I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind; a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
Page 182 - Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain, Our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain. Awake but one, and lo, what myriads rise ! * Each stamps its image as the other flies.
Page 445 - Cast thy bread upon the waters, and thou shalt find it after many days.
Page 80 - Spit, fire! spout, rain! Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire, are my daughters: I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness; I never gave you kingdom, call'd you children, You owe me no subscription: then let fall Your horrible pleasure; here I stand, your slave, A poor, infirm, weak, and despis'd old man.
Page 387 - The winds roared, and the rains fell. The poor white man, faint and weary, came and sat under our tree. He has no mother to bring him milk; no wife to grind his corn.

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