Sir Walter Raleigh

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Macmillan and Company, Limited, 1904 - 292 pages

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Page 292 - O eloquent, just, and mighty Death! whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded; what none hath dared, thou hast done; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised: thou hast drawn together all the far-stretched greatness, all the pride, cruelty, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words, Hie jacet.
Page 292 - EVEN such is time, that takes in trust Our youth, our joys, our all we have, And pays us but with earth and dust; Who, in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days; But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My God shall raise me up, I trust!
Page 232 - You shall receive, my dear wife, my last words, in these my last lines. My love I send you, that you may keep when I am dead ; and my counsel, that you may remember it when I am no more. I would not, with my...
Page 85 - Moncado, with the galleys of which he was captain; and from Calais, driven with squibs from their anchors, were chased out of the sight of England round about Scotland and Ireland; where, for the sympathy of their religion, hoping to find succour and assistance, a great part of them were crushed against the rocks...
Page 85 - ... that landed, being very many in number, were notwithstanding broken, slain and taken, and so sent from village to village, coupled in halters to be shipped into England, where her Majesty, of her princely and invincible disposition disdaining to put them to death, and scorning either to retain or entertain them, they were all sent back again to their countries, to witness and recount the worthy achievements of their invincible and dreadful navy, of which the number of soldiers, the fearful burthen...
Page 233 - ... for me, which, though they have not taken effect as you wished, yet my debt to you is not the less ; but pay it I never shall in this world.
Page 59 - Give me leave, therefore, without offence, always to live and die in this mind: that he is not worthy to live at all that, for fear or danger of death, shunneth his country's service and his own honour, seeing that death is inevitable and the fame of virtue immortal, wherefore in this behalf mutare vel timere sperno.
Page 123 - ... without bush or stubble, all fair green grass, the ground of hard sand easy to march on, either for horse or foot, the deer crossing in every path, the birds towards...

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