Whims and oddities, in prose and verse. The two ser. complete

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Page 145 - Now Ben he loved a pretty maid Her name was Nelly Gray; So he went to pay her his devours When he'd devoured his pay! But when he called on Nelly Gray, She made him quite a scoff; And when she saw his wooden legs, Began to take them off! 'O Nelly Gray! O, Nelly Gray! Is this your love so warm? The love that loves a scarlet coat Should be more uniform!
Page 26 - Ben he was brought to. The Boatswain swore with wicked words, Enough to shock a saint, That though she did seem in a fit, 'Twas nothing but a feint. Come, girl, said he, hold up your head, He'll be as good as me ; For when your swain is in our boat, A boatswain he will be.
Page 2 - I'LL tell you a story that's not in Tom Moore : — Young Love likes to knock at a pretty girl's door : So he call'd upon Lucy — 'twas just ten o'clock — Like a spruce single man, with a smart double knock.
Page 28 - I've met with many a breeze before, But never such a blow." Then reading on his 'bacco box, He heaved a bitter sigh, And then began to eye his pipe, And then to pipe his eye. And then he tried to sing " All's Well," But could not though he tried ; His head was turned, and so he chewed His pigtail till he died.
Page 145 - Now Ben he loved a pretty maid, Her name was Nelly Gray ; So he went to pay her his devours, When he devoured his pay! But when he called on Nelly Gray, She made him quite a scoff; And when she saw his wooden legs, Began to take them off! "O, Nelly Gray! O, Nelly Gray! Is this your love so warm? The love that loves a scarlet coat Should be more uniform!
Page 27 - And see him out of sight." A waterman came up to her, . "Now, young woman," said he, "If you weep on so, you will make Eye-water in the sea.
Page 147 - Now, when he went from Nelly Gray, His heart so heavy got, And life was such a burthen grown, It made him take a knot ! So round his melancholy neck A rope he did entwine, And, for his second time in life, Enlisted in the Line ! One end he tied around a beam, And then removed his pegs, And, as his legs were off — of course He soon was off his legs ! And there he hung, till he was dead As any nail in town, — For, though distress had cut him up, It could not cut him down ! A dozen men sat on his...
Page 146 - you've lost the feet Of legs in war's alarms, And now you cannot wear your shoes Upon your feats of arms!" "O, false and fickle Nelly Gray; I know why you refuse: Though I've no feet — some other man Is standing in my shoes! "I wish I ne'er had seen your face; But now a long farewell! For you will be my death — alas! You will not be my Nell!
Page 114 - I chose one accordingly, a pretty villa, with bow windows, and a prospect delightfully marine. The ocean murmur sounded incessantly from the beach. A decent elderly body, in decayed sables, undertook on her part to promote the comfort of the occupants by every suitable attention, and, as she assured me, at a very reasonable rate.
Page 27 - I'd follow him; But oh ! — I'm not a fish-woman, And so I cannot swim. "Alas! I was not born beneath The Virgin and the Scales, So I must curse my cruel stars, And walk about in Wales.

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