Catholic Educational Review, Volume 13

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Edward Aloysius Pace, Thomas Edward Shields
Catholic University of America Press, 1917 - Education
 

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Page 63 - I FLED Him, down the nights and down the days; I fled Him, down the arches of the years; I fled Him, down the labyrinthine ways Of my own mind; and in the mist of tears I hid from Him, and under running laughter. Up vistaed hopes, I sped; And shot, precipitated, Adown Titanic glooms of chasmed fears, From those strong Feet that followed, followed after. But with unhurrying chase, And unperturbed pace, Deliberate speed, majestic instancy, They beat, — and a Voice beat More instant than the Feet:...
Page 77 - An Act to provide for the promotion of vocational education ; to provide for cooperation with the States in the promotion of such education in agriculture and the trades and industries; to provide for cooperation with the States in the preparation of teachers of vocational subjects ; and to appropriate money and regulate its expenditure,
Page 15 - But when that which is perfect is come, then that which is in part shall be done away. When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things.
Page 226 - Je consens qu'une femme ait des clartés de tout, Mais je ne lui veux point la passion choquante De se rendre savante afin d'être savante; Et j'aime que souvent, aux questions qu'on fait, Elle sache ignorer les choses qu'elle sait: De son étude enfin je veux qu'elle se cache, Et qu'elle ah du savoir sans vouloir qu'on le sache, Sans citer les auteurs, sans dire de grands mots, Et clouer de l'esprit à ses moindres propos.
Page 215 - Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor : suit the action to the word, the word to the action ; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature : for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Page 62 - In the rash lustihead of my young powers, I shook the pillaring hours And pulled my life upon me; grimed with smears, I stand amid the dust o' the mounded years My mangled youth lies dead beneath the heap.
Page 112 - Who, when he was reviled, did not revile : when he suffered, he threatened not: but delivered himself to him that judged him unjustly.
Page 98 - There is not, and there never was on this earth, a work of human policy so well deserving of examination as the Roman Catholic Church.
Page 63 - I dimly guess what Time in mists confounds; Yet ever and anon a trumpet sounds From the hid battlements of Eternity, Those shaken mists a space unsettle, then Round the half-glimpsed turrets slowly wash again...
Page 63 - All which I took from thee I did but take, Not for thy harms, But just that thou might'st seek it in My arms. All which thy child's mistake Fancies as lost, I have stored for thee at home: . Rise, clasp My hand, and come!

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