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LONDON REVIEW.

No. IV.

NOVEMBER 1, 1809.

ON THE SPANISH REVOLUTION.

I. CONCERNING THE RELATIONS OF GREAT BRITAIN, SPAIN,

AND PORTUGAL, TO EACH OTHER, AND TO THE COMMON ENEMY, AT THIS CRISIS; AND SPECIFICALLY AS AFFECTED BY THE CONVENTION OF CINTRA: THE WHOLE BROUGHT TO THE TEST OF THOSE PRINCIPLES, BY WHICH ALONE THE INDEPENDENCE AND FREEDOM OF NATIONS CAN BE PRESERVED OR RÉCOVERED. BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH. -8vo. pp. 216. 58. Longman, London. 1809.

II. LETTERS FROM PORTUGAL AND SPAIN; COMPRISING AN

ACCOUNT OF THE OPERATIONS OF THE ARMIES UNDER THEIR EXCELLENCIES SIR ARTHUR WELLESLEY AND SIR JOHN MOORE, FROM THE LANDING OF THE TROOPS FROM MONDEGO BAY TO THE BATTLE OF CORUNNA, ILLUSTRATED WITH ENGRAVINGS BY HEATH, FITLER, WARREN, &c., FROM DRAWINGS MADE ON THE SPOT. BY ADAM NEALE, M.D. F.L.S.Ato.

pp. 116. 21. 2s. Philips. London. 1809. VOL. II,

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III. AN ACCOUNT OF THE BRITISH ARMY, AND OF THE STATE

OF THE SENTIMENTS OF THE PEOPLE OF PORTUGAL AND SPALŃ, DURING THE CAMPAIGNS OF THE YEARS 1808 AND 1809. IN A SERIES OF LETTERS. BY THE REV. JAMES WILMOT ORMSBY, A.21. CHAPLAIN OF THE STAFF, &c.12mo. 2 vols. pp. 238 and 278. London. Carpenter. 1809.

IV. LETTERS FROM PORTUGAL AND SPAIN; WRITTEN DURING

THE “MARCH OF THE BRITISH TROOPS UNDER SIR JOHN

MOORE: WITH A MAP OF THE ROUTE, AND APPROPRIATE EAGRAVINGS. BY AN OFFICER. London. Longman. 1809.

TWENTY years have now passed since the first stirrings of that mighty convulsion, which we have hitherto been accustomed to name after the country where it took its rise; but to which future ages will probably aflix a title more expressive of the extent to which it will have been spread. Already have the ravages of foreign war and domestic dissension been so undiscriminating and unsparing, that, with the solitary and enviable exception of Great Britain, not one of the independent states, which in the year 1792 constituted the great European republic, now remains, which has not beheld, either its sovereign perish by à violent death, or its capital occupied by an hostile power. And if we revert to the fate of the mighty masters of those countries, (for at all times the history of sovereigns has unliappily occupied more of the attention of mankind than that of nations,) we shall find instances of sweeping desolation, which remind us of the tragic tales of antiquity, in which whole families of proscribed monarchs are exhibited as sustaining every calamity incident to human nature, from the dire curse of some malignant deity. To take, for illustration, the royal houses of Europe ; we find that there is not a single continental king, the inheritor of a crown, who is at this hour seated on his throne in his capital. The descendants of the most illustrious of these dynasties, are

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now literally fugitives and mendicants; the legal heirs of a second kingdom, trepanned from their dominions, have been transferred to obscure prisons; another royal family has been driven to the new world; two Italian kings have taken refuge in islands of the Mediterranean; one northern sovereign has been deposed by his own subjects, and another, after sustaining the loss of one half of his territory, still fears to return to his ordinary residence. In short, it is only the kings of Great Britain and Denmark, each reigning over islands, who continue to dwell in the palaces of their forefathers. The fate of the European emperors seems yet at issue; for only one of them, and he the first in rank, is in a state of present suffering, tottering on the brink of extermination : while the other two are in possession of their full authority. But of these, it is to be remarked, that both owe their crowns to the murder of their predecessors, their near kinsmen, which they have not avenged, and by which they have profited: the fate of one of them, however, may be distinctly foreseen; whilst the other is pursuing a system of policy so contrary to his real interests, that its consequences cannot well be otherwise than ultimately fatal to himself. The lot of the minor states of Europe, its electorates, dutchies, earldoms, its republics federal and independent, &c. is not less remarkable; and in the history of each, we find traces of that revolutionary spirit, which will give a character and name to the present age.

Many and extraordinary must have been the events which have led to such tremendous and awful conclusions, yet among all these there is not one which will attract more of the atten. tion of posterity, or which at this moment presents so much interesting matter for contemplation, as the Spanish revolution, to which it is our wish now to invite the attention of the reader.

In one most interesting particular, and in one only, the revolution in Spain resembles that of France. In both, the political body has been dissolved, and the nation resolved into

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A Letter on Recent Events. By Mr. Hague.

The Plan of Reform, proposed by Sir Francis Burdett, correctly reported in Two Speeches, delivered in Parliament, recommending an Inquiry into the State of the Representation. Is.

Observations on the Tendency of the late Meetings, for returning Thanks to Mi. Wardle. 2s. 6d.

A Second Letter on the Claims of Colonel Wardle to the Thanks of his Country. ls.

American Candour, in a Tract lately published at Boston, en. titled,-An Analysis of the late correspondence between our Administration, and Great Britain, and France; with an Attempt to shew what are the Real Causes of the Failure of the Negociation. 38. 6d.

A Warning to the People of England. By a Friend to his Country. 1s.

Concerning the Relations of Great Britain, Spain, and Portugal, to each other, and to the common Enemy of this Crisis.' By Wil. diam Wordsworth. 5s.

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VOYAGES AND TRAVELS.

Travels in India, the Red Sea, Abyssinia, &c. By Lord Vis.

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