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Of Dardanus, how born in Italy;
From hence he into Phrygia did fly.
And leaving Tuscane, where he erst had place,
With Corythus did sail to Samothrace;
But now enthronized he sits on high,
In golden palace of the starry sky.

LVI. BOOK II. CH. XIV. § 1.

Horace, Od. iv. ix. 25-8. Many by valour have deserved renown

Ere Agamemnon, yet lie all oppressed : Under long night, unwept for and unknown;

For with no sacred poet were they blest.

LVII. BOOK II. CH. XXI. $ 6.

Horace, Od. III. iv. 45-8.
Who rules the duller earth, the wind-swollen

streams,
The civil cities and the infernal realms,
Who the host of heaven and the mortal band
Alone doth govern by his just command.

LVIII. BOOK II. CI. XXII. § 6.

Ausonius, Epigr. CXVIII.
I am that Dido which thou here dost

see,
Cunningly framed in beauteous imagery.
Like this I was, but had not such a soul
As Maro feigned, incestuous and foul.
Æneas never with his Trojan host
Beheld my face, or landed on this coast.

This was my

But flying proud Iarbas' villainy-
Not moved by furious love or jealousy-
I did, with weapon chaste, to save my fame,
Make way for death untimely ere it came.

end. But first I built a town,
Revenged my husband's death, lived with renown.
Why didst thou stir up Virgil, envious Muse,
Falsely my name and honour to abuse ?
Readers, believe historians; not those
Which to the world Jove's thefts and vice expose.
Poets are liars; and for verses' sake,
Will make the gods of human crimes partake.

LIX, BOOK II. CH. XXIII. § 4.

Horace, Od. III. xxiv. 36-41.
Nor southern heat nor northern snow,
That freezing to the ground doth grow,
The subject regions can fence,
And keep the greedy merchant thence.
The subtle shipmen way will find,
Storm never so the seas with wind.

LX. BOOK II. CH. XXIII. § 5.

Horace, Od. iv. ii. 17, 18. Such as like heavenly wights do come With an Elean garland home.

LXI. BOOK II. CH. XXIV. § 1. (Compare No. Liv.)

Virgil, Æneid, 1. 530-3.
THERE is a land which Greeks Hesperia name,

Ancient and strong, of much fertility;

Enotrians held it; but we hear by fame,

That, by late ages of posterity,
'Tis from a captain's name called Italy.

LXII, BOOK II. CH. XXIV. § 5.

Juvenal, viii. 272-5. Yet, though thou fetch thy pedigree so far, Thy first progenitor, whoe'er he were, Some shepherd was; or else—that I'll forbear.

LXIII. BOOK III. CH. VII. § 3.

Horace, Od. 111. ii. 31-2. SELDOM the villain, though much haste he make, Lame-footed vengeance fails to overtake.

LXIV. BOOK IV. ch. I. § 5.

Horace, Od. III. xvi. 13-15.

By gifts the Macedon clave gates asunder,
The kings envying his estate brought under.

LXV. BOOK IV. CH. II. § 8.

Homer, Od. XVIII. 135-6.
THE minds of men are ever so affected
As by God's will they daily are directed.

LXVI. BOOK IV. CH. II. § 15.

Claudian in Eutrop. I. 321-3. Over the Medes and light Sabæans reigns

This female sex; and under arms of Queen Great part of the Barbarian land remains.

LXVII. BOOK V. CH. II. § 1.

Juvenal, viii. 121-2.

HAVE special care that valiant poverty
Be not oppressed with too great injury.

LXVIII. BOOK V. Ch. VI. § 11.

Pausan. (v11) XII. vol. iii. p. 182, Siebelis. ONE fire than other burns more forcibly;

One wolf than other wolves does bite more sore; One hawk than other hawks more swift doth fly;

So one most mischievous of men before, Callicrates, false knave as knave might be, Met with Menalcidas, more false than he.?

LXIX, BOOK V. CH. VI. § 12.

Juvenal, x. 96-7.
Even they that have no murderous will
Would have it in their power to kill.

1 “A bye-word, taken up among the Achæans, whenas that mischievous Callicrates, who had been too hard for all worthy and virtuous men, was beaten at his own weapor, by one of his own condition.”

XXV.

NO PLEASURE WITHOUT PAIN.?

(Before 1576.)

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WEET were the joys that both might

like and last; Strange were the state exempt from

all distress; Happy the life that no mishap should taste;

Blessed the chance might never change success. Were such a life to lead or state to prove, Who would not wish that such a life were love?

But oh! the soury sauce of sweet unsure,

When pleasures flit, and fly with waste of wind. The trustless trains that hoping hearts allure,

When sweet delights do but allure the mind; When care consumes and wastes the wretched wight, While fancy feeds and draws of her delight.

· This and the next five poems are placed last, because I cannot satisfy myself that the evidence is conclusive in Raleigh's favour. But I do not exclude them altogether, because in each case there is some evidence which others have accepted, and no stronger claim has been set up for any other person.

2 “Paradise of Dainty Devices," 1576, signed “W. R.” in ed. 1578; see Collier's reprint, p. 20, and “ Bibl. Cat.," vol. i. p. 245; signed “ W. Hunnis" in editions 1580 and 1596, where it is No. 12; in other editions signed “E. S."

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