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What fury, what great madness, doth beguile

Men's minds, that man should ugly shapes adore, Of birds or bulls or dragons, or the vile

Half-dog, half-man, on knees for aid implore !

XXXVI. BOOK I. CH. XI. § 7.

Cic. De Divin. 11. 56, et al.
IF Cresus over Halys go,
Great kingdoms he shall overthrow.

XXXVII. BOOK I. CH. XI. § 8.

Lucretius, 11. 54-5.

WE fear by light, as children in the dark.

XXXVIII. BOOK II. CH. VI. §. 4.

Æschylus, P. V. 456-61. But fortune governed all their works, till when

I first found out how stars did set and rise, A profitable art to mortal men.

And others of like use I did devise :

As letters to compose in learned wise I first did teach, and first did amplify The mother of the Muses, Memory.

XXXIX. BOOK II. CH. VI. § 5.

Ovid, Metam. I. 322-3.

No man was better nor more just than he,
Nor any woman godlier than she.

XL. BOOK II. CH. VII. § 3. f 3.

Sidonius, Carm. xvii. 15, 16.
I HAVE no wine of Gaza nor Falerna wine,
Nor any for thy drinking of Sarepta's vine.

XLI. BOOK II. CH. VII. § 4. † 6.

Virgil, Georg. II. 448
OF
yew

the Ituræans' bows were made.

XLII. BOOK II. CH, VIII. § 1.

Virgil, Æneid, 1. 728-30. The queen anon commands the weighty bowl, Weighty with precious stones and massy gold, To flow with wine. This Belus used of old,

And all of Belus' line.

XLIII. BOOK II. CH. VIII. § 1.

Lucan, Pharsal. III. 220.1. PHÔNICIANS first, if fame may credit have, In rude characters dared our words to grave.

XLIV. BOOK II. CH. VIII. § 1.

Diog. Laert. VII. 30.
IF a Phænician born I am, what then?
Cadmus was so; to whom Greece owes

The books of learned men.

XLT. BOOK II. CH. X. § 2.

Tibullus, I. vii. 18.

THE white dore is for holy held in Syria Palestine.

XLVI. BOOK II. CH. XIII. § 3.

Ovid, Am. II. ii. 43-4. HERE Tantalus in water seeks for water, and doth

miss The fleeting fruit he catcheth at; his long tongue

brought him this.

XLVII BOOK II. CH. XIII. § 3.

Herace, Sat. I. i. 68-70. THE thirsting Tantalus doth catch at streams that

from him flee; Why laughest thou? The name but changed, the

tale is told of thee.

XLVIII. BOOK II. CH, XIII. § Natalis Com. p. 627, ed. 1612, out of Pindar, Ol. i. 60-63. BECAUSE that, stealing immortality, He did both nectar and ambrosia give To guests of his own age to make them live.

XLIX, BOOK II. CH. XIII. $ 3. Tibullus, 1. iii. 75-6, out of Homer, Od. xi. 576. NINE furlongs stretched lies Tityus, who for his

wicked deeds The hungry birds with his renewing liver daily

feeds.

L. BOOK II. CH. XIII. § 3.

Ovid, Heroid. xvi. 179-80.

STRONG Ilion thou shalt see with walls and towers

high, Built with the harp of wise Apollo's harmony.

LI. BOOK II. CH. XIII. § 4.

Horace, Od. ill. xvi. 1-11.

THE brazen tower, with doors close barred,
And watchful bandogs' frightful guard,

Kept safe the maidenhead
Of Danae from secret love,
Till smiling Venus and wise Jove

Beguiled her father's dread:
For, changed into a golden shower,
The god into her lap did pour

Himself and took his pleasure. Through guards and stony walls to break The thunderbolt is far more weak

Than is a golden treasure.

LII. BOOK II. CH. XIII. $ 8.

Lucretius, v. 325.8.

If all this world had no original,

But things have ever been as now they are Before the siege of Thebes or Troy's last fall,

Why did no poet sing some elder war ?

LIII. BOOK II. CH. XIV. § 1.

Virgil, Æneid, 11. 104-12. In the main sea the isle of Crete doth lie, Whence Jove was born; thence is our progeny. There is Mount Ida; there in fruitful land An hundred great and goodly cities stand. Thence, if I follow not mistaken fame, Teucer, the eldest of our grandsires, came To the Rhætean shores, and reigned there Ere yet fair Ilion was built, and ere The towers of Troy. Their dwelling-place they

sought In lowest vales. Hence Cybel's rites were brought; Hence Corybantian cymbals did remove; And hence the name of our Idæan grove.

LIV. BOOK II. CH. XIV. § 1.

Virgil, Æneid, n. 163-8. HESPERIA the Grecians call the place,An ancient fruitful land, a warlike race. Enotrians held it; now the later progeny Gives it their captain's name, and calls it Italy. This seat belongs to us; hence Dardanus, Hence came the author of our stock, Iasius.

LV, BOOK II. CH. XIV. § 1.

Virgil, Æneid, vII. 205-11. Some old Auruncans, I remember wellThough time have made the fame obscure-would

tell

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