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To please us his cur he kept under clog,
And was ever after both shepherd and dog.
For oblation to Pan his custom was thus :-
He first gave a trifle, then offered up us.
And through his false worship such power he did

gain,

As kept him o'th' mountain and us on the plain : Where many a hornpipe he tuned to his Phyllis, And sweetly sung Walsingham to’s Amaryllis.

(Two lines omitted.)

VII.

A POEM PUT INTO MY LADY LAITON'S POCKET

BY SIR WALTER RALEIGH.1

LADY, farewell, whom I in silence serve !

Would God thou knewest the depth of my desire ! Then mought I wish, though nought I can deserve,

Some drops of grace to slake my scalding fire But sith to live alone I have decreed, I'll spare to speak, that I may spare to speed !

VIII.

SIR W. RALEIGH ON THE SNUFF OF A CANDLE

THE NIGHT BEFORE HE DIED.?

COWARDS (may] fear to die; but courage stout,
Rather than live in snuff, will be put out.

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Chetham MS., 8012, p. 85; erased, but still legible.
Raleigh's “Remains," p. 253, edition 1661, &c.

XXIV.

METRICAL TRANSLATIONS

OCCURRING IN SIR W. RALEIGH'S HISTORY OF

THE WORLD,

1. BOOK I. CH. I. $ 6.

Virgil, Æneid, vi. 724-7.
HE heaven and earth and all the liquid

main,
The moon's bright globe and stars

Titanian, A spirit within maintains; and their whole mass A mind, which through each part infused doth pass, Fashions and works, and wholly doth transpierce All this great body of the universe.

II. BOOK I. CH. I. § 7.

Ovid, Metam. iy. 226-8. THE world discerns itself, while I the world behold; By me the longest years and other times are told; I, the world's eye.

III. BOOK I. CH. I. § 11.
Ovid, Trist. iii. vi. 18; and Juvenal, vii. 201.

'Gainst fate no counsel can prevail.
Kingdoms to slaves by destiny,
To captives triumphs given be.

IV. BOOK I. CH. I. § 15.
Athenæus (? Agathon : cf. Ar. Eth. N. vi. 4).

FROM wisdom fortune differs far ;
And yet in works most like they are.

V. BOOK I. CH. 1. § 15.

Ovid, Remed. Am. 119.

WHILE fury gallops on the way,
Let no man fury's gallop stay.

VI. BOOK I. CH. II. § 1.

Ovid, Metam. i. 76-8.

MORE holy than the rest, and understanding more, A living creature wants, to rule all made before; So man began to be.

VII. BOOK I. CH. II. § 3. Marius Victor, de perversis suæ æt. moribus Epist. 30-33.

DISEASES, famine, enemies, in us no change have

wrought; What erst we were, we are; still in the same snare

caught: No time can our corrupted manners mend; In vice we dwell, in sin that hath no end.

VIII. BOOK I. CH. II. § 5.

Ovid, Metam. i. 414-5. From thence our kind hard-hearted is, enduring

pain and care ; Approving that our bodies of a stony nature are.

IX. BOOK I. CH. II. § 5.
Albinovanus, Eleg. de ob. Mec. 113-4.
THE plants and trees made poor and old

By winter envious,

The spring-time bounteous
Covers again from shame and cold;
But never man repaired again

His youth and beauty lost,

Though art and care and cost
Do promise nature's help in vain.

X. BOOK I. CH. II. § 5.

Catull. Carm. v. 4-6.

The sun may set and rise ;
But we, contrariwise,
Sleep after our short light
One everlasting night.

XI. BOOK I. CH. III. $ 3.

Ovid, Metam. I. 61-2.

THE East wind with Aurora hath abiding

Among the Arabian and the Persian hills, Whom Phoebus first salutes at his uprising.

XII. BOOK I. CH. III.

§ 3. Ovid, Metam. 1. 107-8.

The joyful spring did ever last, and Zephyrus did

breed Sweet flowers by his gentle blast, without the help

of seed.

XIII. BOOK I. CH. IV. § 2.

Virgil, Æneid 1. 490-1.

THE Amazon with crescent-formed shield
Penthesilea leads into the field.

XIV. BOOK I. CH. V. § 5.

Lucan, Pharsal. iv. 373-8, 380-1.

O WASTEFUL riot, never well content

With low-priced fare; hunger ambitious
Of cates by land and sea far fetched and sent;

Vain glory of a table sumptuous;
Learn with how little life be preserved.

In gold and myrrh they need not to carouse ; But with the brook the people's thirst is served, Who, fed with bread and water, are not starved.

may

XV. BOOK I. CH. V. § 8. John Cassam out of Orpheus, Fragm. L. from Etym. M.

From the earth and from thy blood, O heaven, they

came, Whom thereupon the gods did giants name.

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