Translating Kali's Feast: The Goddess in Indo-Caribbean Ritual and Fiction

Front Cover
Translating Kali's Feast is an interdisciplinary study of the Goddess Kali bringing together ethnography and literature within the theoretical framework of translation studies. The idea for the book grew out of the experience and fieldwork of the authors, who lived with Indo-Caribbean devotees of the Hindu Goddess in Guyana. Using a variety of discursive forms including oral history and testimony, field notes, songs, stories, poems, literary essays, photographic illustrations, and personal and theoretical reflections, it explores the cultural, aesthetic and spiritual aspects of the Goddess in a diasporic and cross-cultural context. With reference to critical and cultural theorists including Walter Benjamin and Julia Kristeva, the possibilities offered by Kali (and other manifestations of the Goddess) as the site of translation are discussed in the works of such writers as Wilson Harris, V.S. Naipaul and R.K. Narayan. The book articulates perspectives on the experience of living through displacement and change while probing the processes of translation involved in literature and ethnography and postulating links between 'rite' and 'write,' Hindu 'leela' and creole 'play.'
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Kalis Story
3
Madrasi Religion in Guyana
11
Thinking Through the Gap
25
The Devouring Mother in Wilson Harris and V S Naipaul
37
Naipauls Indian Darkness Narayans Stone Gayatri
49
Gardens Groves and Other Places and Spaces in Narayans Novels
69
Is Shakti Shanti?
87
Goddesses Ghosts and Translatability in Jonestown I
93
Tribute
149
Return to Secular Life
153
Vision
155
Guyana Kali Puja Lexicon
157
Translating Culture
165
Translation Ethnography and Literature
167
Translation ethnography and literature
168
Translator ethnographer and author
172

In The Feast and Festivities of Mother Kali
109
Prologue to the Feast 111
111
The Awakening of Mother
119
The Sacred Garden
127
Night Interlude
137
Feast and Festivity
141
Translation and postcolonial identity
175
Translation and Caribbean culture
181
Translating Kalis Feast
185
Bibliography
193
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 3 - It is not the object of the story to convey a happening per se, which is the purpose of information; rather, it embeds it in the life of the storyteller in order to pass it on as experience to those listening.

Bibliographic information