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A Guide to College Life

BY

KATE W. JAMESON

DEAN OF WOMEN
OREGON STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE

AND

FRANK C. LOCKWOOD

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS, ARTS, AND SCIENCES

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

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COPYRIGHT, 1925,

BY D. C. HEATH AND COMPANY

2 F 5

334291

с

PRINTED IN U.S.A.

PREFACE

The transition from high school to college is a difficult and dangerous one. It seems only a step; but that step is across a mighty gulf that separates a girl from home and childhood, and sets her in a new great world where she is to work out her own destiny. The first days at college are almost sure to be a time of great anxiety and strain. All about her is strange and untried. She must now make her own choices. She must direct herself. She finds the intense and pulsating life of the campus fascinating but confusing. She is likely to have hours of loneliness and homesickness. The social attractions, and the insistent appeal of student activities – highly organized and urgently presented — make it very hard for her to weigh and compare values correctly. Too often students come up from their high schools ill-prepared; few high school students have learned the art of study; and as the university instructor is usually severe in his requirements, and as his ways are very different from the ways of her high school teachers, she is likely at first to make sore blunders and poor grades. Then, too, many students have a very vague conception of the real meaning of a college course. In most of our larger institutions a considerable percentage of the Freshman Class is sent home during the year; and in every Freshman Class there are a good many students who stumble and blunder painfully through the year, and if saved, are saved only as by fire.

In view of all this, it seems to us, as instructors and executives, that we owe it to the Freshmen, in some measure at least, to show them the way to the things that are worth while, and to set the signal lights for them along a somewhat perilous route. And we think that a good number of students will hear and heed. It seems to us that there is almost no type of wisdom so high as that which, by anticipation, can learn from the faults and mistakes, from the virtues and success of others how to choose the right course of action and how to avoid the wrong one. This little book is the result of such convictions and such hopes. Our object is to offer to Freshmen girls the moment they come upon the campus, or a little earlier if possible, a simple, sympathetic, and comprehensive manual that shall be a guide to them through the early and trying days of their college life, and shall set before them sound and inspiring ideals of conduct and character. We have sought to secure the best and most inspiring utterances possible on a given subject. We believe that we have succeeded in this effort. We have been particularly fortunate in getting vital contributions from such eminent men and women as President Mary E. Woolley, Dean L. B. R. Briggs, Dean Thomas A. Clark, Dr. Charles D. Lockwood, President Ada Louise Comstock, Professor Vida D. Scudder, and Mrs. Beatrice Forbes-Robertson Hale. We desire to express our thanks to the various authors and publishers who have generously permitted us to use material already in print. Due and detailed acknowledgment for such courtesies will be found in the footnotes accompanying these selections.

KATE W. JAMESON

FRANK C. LOCKWOOD TUCSON, ARIZONA,

May 18, 1925.

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