Historical Dictionary of Quotations in Cognitive Science: A Treasury of Quotations in Psychology, Philosophy, and Artificial Intelligence

Front Cover
Morton Wagman
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2000 - Psychology - 271 pages


This scholarly treasury of over 450 distinguished quotations, divided into 170 categories, focuses on the best thinking in the disciplines of psychology, philosophy, and artificial intelligence, from the classical period of Greece to contemporary cognitive science. Quotations are arranged chronologically within categories. This work will be of interest to scholars and professionals in psychology, artificial intelligence, and cognitive science as well as undergraduate and graduate students in these disciplines.

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Contents

CXXI
119
CXXII
121
CXXIII
122
CXXIV
123
CXXV
124
CXXVI
125
CXXVII
126
CXXVIII
127

X
3
XI
4
XII
5
XIII
6
XIV
7
XV
8
XVI
9
XVII
10
XVIII
11
XIX
12
XX
13
XXI
15
XXII
16
XXIV
17
XXVI
18
XXVII
19
XXVIII
20
XXIX
21
XXX
22
XXXI
23
XXXII
25
XXXIII
26
XXXV
27
XXXVII
28
XXXVIII
29
XXXIX
30
XL
31
XLI
32
XLII
33
XLIII
34
XLIV
35
XLV
36
XLVI
37
XLVII
38
XLVIII
39
XLIX
40
L
41
LI
42
LII
43
LIII
44
LIV
45
LV
46
LVI
47
LVII
48
LVIII
49
LIX
50
LX
51
LXI
52
LXII
53
LXV
54
LXVI
55
LXVII
57
LXVIII
58
LXIX
59
LXX
60
LXXI
61
LXXIII
62
LXXIV
63
LXXV
64
LXXVI
65
LXXVIII
69
LXXIX
70
LXXX
71
LXXXI
72
LXXXII
73
LXXXIII
75
LXXXIV
76
LXXXV
77
LXXXVI
79
LXXXVII
80
LXXXVIII
81
LXXXIX
82
XC
83
XCI
85
XCIII
86
XCV
87
XCVI
89
XCVII
90
XCVIII
91
XCIX
92
C
93
CI
94
CII
95
CIII
96
CIV
97
CV
98
CVI
101
CVII
103
CIX
104
CX
105
CXI
106
CXII
107
CXIII
108
CXIV
111
CXV
113
CXVI
114
CXVII
115
CXVIII
116
CXIX
117
CXX
118
CXXIX
128
CXXX
129
CXXXI
130
CXXXII
131
CXXXIII
132
CXXXV
133
CXXXVI
134
CXXXVII
135
CXXXVIII
136
CXXXIX
137
CXL
138
CXLI
139
CXLII
140
CXLIII
141
CXLIV
142
CXLV
143
CXLVI
144
CXLVII
145
CXLVIII
146
CXLIX
147
CL
148
CLII
149
CLIII
150
CLIV
151
CLV
152
CLVI
153
CLVII
154
CLVIII
157
CLIX
158
CLX
159
CLXI
160
CLXII
161
CLXIII
162
CLXIV
163
CLXV
164
CLXVI
165
CLXVII
167
CLXVIII
168
CLXIX
169
CLXXII
170
CLXXIII
171
CLXXIV
172
CLXXV
173
CLXXVI
174
CLXXVII
175
CLXXVIII
176
CLXXIX
177
CLXXX
178
CLXXXI
179
CLXXXII
181
CLXXXIII
182
CLXXXIV
183
CLXXXV
184
CLXXXVIII
185
CLXXXIX
186
CXC
187
CXCI
188
CXCII
189
CXCIII
190
CXCIV
191
CXCV
192
CXCVI
193
CXCVII
194
CXCIX
195
CCI
196
CCII
197
CCIII
198
CCIV
199
CCV
200
CCVI
201
CCVII
202
CCVIII
203
CCIX
204
CCX
205
CCXI
206
CCXII
207
CCXIII
208
CCXIV
209
CCXV
210
CCXVI
211
CCXVII
212
CCXVIII
213
CCXIX
214
CCXX
215
CCXXI
216
CCXXII
217
CCXXIII
219
CCXXIV
220
CCXXV
221
CCXXVI
222
CCXXVII
223
CCXXVIII
224
CCXXIX
225
CCXXXI
227
CCXXXII
229
CCXXXIII
230
CCXXXIV
231
CCXXXV
249
CCXXXVI
255
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 193 - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe any thing but the perception.
Page 110 - Human beings do not live in the objective world alone, nor alone in the world of social activity as ordinarily understood, but are very much at the mercy of the particular language which has become the medium of expression for their society.
Page 193 - I may venture to affirm of the rest of mankind, that they are nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each other with an inconceivable rapidity and are in a perpetual flux and movement.
Page 111 - Giving orders and obeying them Describing the appearance of an object, or giving its measurements Constructing an object from a description (a drawing) Reporting an event Speculating about an event Forming and testing a hypothesis Presenting the results of an experiment in tables and diagrams Making up a story; and reading it Play-acting Singing catches Guessing riddles Making a joke; telling it Solving a problem in practical arithmetic Translating from one language into another Asking, thanking,...
Page 84 - Malthus on Population' and being well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long continued observation of the habits of animals and plants...
Page 112 - We are thus introduced to a new principle of relativity, which holds that all observers are not led by the same physical evidence to the same picture of the universe, unless their linguistic backgrounds are similar, or can in some way be calibrated.
Page 193 - THERE are some philosophers who imagine we are every moment intimately conscious of what we call our self; that we feel its existence and its continuance in existence; and are certain, beyond the evidence of a demonstration, both of its perfect identity and simplicity.
Page 74 - Universal History, the history of what man has accomplished in this world, is at bottom the History of the Great Men who have worked here.
Page 103 - Without sensibility, no object would be given to us; without understanding, no object would be thought. Thoughts without content are empty; intuitions without concepts are blind.
Page 101 - It is indeed an opinion strangely prevailing amongst men, that houses, mountains, rivers, and in a word all sensible objects, have an existence, natural or real, distinct from their being perceived by the understanding.

About the author (2000)

MORTON WAGMAN is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His most recent works include The Human Mind According to Artificial Intelligence (Praeger, 1999) and Scientific Discovery Processes in Humans and Computers (Praeger, 1999).

Bibliographic information