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FROM

NATURE;

OR,

Hints to Juvenile Naturalists.

BY THE AUTHOR OF

THE YOUNG EMIGRANTS THE STEP-BROTHERS-PREJUDICE

REPROVED-JUVENILE FORGET ME NOT

NURSERY FABLES, &c.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR HARVEY AND DARTON,

GRACECHURCH-STREET.

1830.

2521. f. 39

PREFACE.

AMONG the various amusements that offer themselves as a relaxation from the 'necessary restraints and fatigues of childish study, there is not one that presents greater advantages, as a source of pleasing and rational enjoyment, than the possession of little domestic animals.

A child of a benevolent and affectionate disposition, will here find full scope for exercising many amiable qualities, and will hardly fail of regarding with feelings of lively interest, the creatures that he cherishes, and which are so entirely dependent on his care for the supply of their several necessities. He will be amply repaid for

the trouble he bestows, and the time he devotes to them, snatched from other and lighter sports, by their grateful attachment to his person, and the mute caresses they offer in return for his kindness; beside the satisfaction of seeing his little favourites happily thriving beneath the attentive care of a tender master.

Here too he will, if of a reflecting turn of mind, derive much real and rational pleasure from studying the natural history, the habits, and even the peculiar traits of character that distinguish each individual in his little family. Nor is this all. Many useful lessons of morality and industry are to be gathered by the little student of nature, which, if aptly applied by himself, or his parents or preceptors, to his own condition, may be rendered invaluable,

and bring forth excellent fruits in the child's progress from youth to manhood.

Let us not despise this simple source of knowledge. “Go to the ant, thou sluggard,” says the king of Israel; “ consider her ways, and be wise.” The royal preacher was not above drawing wisdom from the lowly things of earth-wisdom and knowledge, whose excellence was the wonder of all nations, as we learn from the history of the kings of Israel and Judah. In the Second Book of Chronicles we read of this great king, that his wisdom exceeded the wisdom of all nations of the East ; that people came from far countries to see his works and hear his words ; that he was skilled in all natural history, for he spake of trees from the cedar that is on Mount Lebanon, to the hyssop that groweth out of

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