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WORLD-WRITERS, WRITING.
WORLD-continued.

O world! so few the years we live,
Would that the life which thou give
Were life indeed!
Alas! thy sorrows fall so fast,
Our happiest hour is when at last
The soul is freed.

Longfellow, Translatione,
The world is just as hollow as an egg-shell,
It is a surface not a solid, round;
And all this boasted knowledge of the world
To me seems but to mean acquaintance with
Low things, or eril, or indifferent.

Bailey, Festus. WORMS. A man may fish with a worm that hath eat of a king.

Sh. Ham. IV. 3. WORSHIP- - see Devotion, Prayer.

First worship God; he that forgets to pray,

Bids not himself good-morrow, nor good-day. T. Randolph. WORTH, WORTHINESS- see Courage, Misery, Poverty.

Worth makes the man, and want of it the fellow;
The rest is all but leather or prunella. Pope, E. M. iv. 203.
To hide true worth from public view,
Is burying diamonds in their mine ;
All is not gold that shines, 'tis true:
But all that is gold-ought to shine.

S. Bishop. WRATH- -sce Anger, Passion, Rage.

Come not within the measure of my wrath. Sh. Two G. v. 4. WRETCH.

A needy, hollow-eyed, sharp-looking wretch,
A living dead man.

Sh. Com. of Er. v. 1. WRINKLES-see Age.

Fled are the charms that grac'd that ivory brow,
Where smil'd a dimple, gapes a wrinkle now.

Robert Treat Paine (Am.). WRITERS, WRITING—see Authorship, Criticism, Poetry.

Sound judgment is the ground of writing well,
And when philosophy directs your choice,
To proper subjects richly understood,
Words from the pen will naturally flow.

Roscommon, from Horace. 'Tis hard to say, if greater want of skill Appear in writing or in judging ill.

Pope, E. C. 1. You write with ease to show your breeding, But easy writing's curs'd hard reading. Sheridan, Clio's Prot,

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YEARS—see Time.

Jumping o'er time, Turning the accomplishments of many years Into an hour-glass.

Sh. Hen. V. 1. 1, Chorus. Years following years, steal something every day ; At last they steal us from ourselves away.

Pope, Imit. of Hor. 2. 11. 72.

Years steal
Fire from the mind, as vigour from the limb;
And life's enchanted cup but sparkles near the brim.

Byron, Ch. H. 111. 8. YEOMEN.

And you, good yeomen,
Whose limbs were made in England, show us here
The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear
That you are worth your breeding; which I doubt not ;
For there is none of you so mean and base,
That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.

Sh. Hen. 1'. 111. 1. YES AND NO.

Yes, I answered you last night;
No, this morning, sir, I say :
Colours seen by candle-light
Will not look the same by day.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Lady's Yes. YEW-TREE.

Cheerless, unsocial plant ! that loves to dwell
'Midst skulls and coffins, epitaphs and worms:
Where light-heeld ghosts, and visionary shades,
Beneath the wan cold moon (as fame reports)
Embodied, thick, perform their mystic rounds.

No other merriment, dull tree! is thine. Blair, Grave, 22. YOUTH see Age, Boyhood, Childhood, Disparity, Education, Flogging, Home.

For youth no less becomes
The light and careless livery that it wears,
Than settled age his sables, and his weeds
Importing health and graveness.

Sh. Ham. IV. 7. That age

is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer ; But, being spent, the worse, and worst Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but use your time ; And while ye may, go marry : For, having lost but once your prime, You may for ever tarry. Herrick, Amatory Odes, 93.

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YOUTH- continued.

How small a part of time they share,
That are so wondrous sweet and fair. Waller, Go, lovely Rose.
Intemperate youth, by sad experience found,
Ends in an age imperfect and unsound. Sir Jno. Denham.
Something of youth I in old age approve ;
But more the marks of age in youth I love.
Who this observes may in his body find
Decrepit age, but never in his mind. Sir Jno. Denham.
Grief seldom join'd with youthful bloom is seen ;
Can sorrow be where knowledge scarce has been ?

Howard, Indian Queen.
We think our fathers fools, so wise we grow;
Our wiser sons, no doubt, will think us so. Pope, E. C. 438.
Fair ghs the morn, and soft the zephyr blows,
While proudly riding, o'er the azure realm
In gallant trim the gilded vessel goes,
Youth on the prow, and Pleasure at the helm ;
Regardless of the sweeping whirlwind's sway,
That, hush'd in grim repose, expects his evening prey.

Gray, Bard, :1. 2. The charms of youth at once are seen and past; And Nature says, “ They are too sweet to last." So blooms the rose, and so the blushing maid ; Be gay : too soon the flowers of Spring will fade. Sir TV. Jones, Be it a weakness, it deserves some praise, We love the play-place of our early days. The scene is touching, and the heart is stone, That feels not at that sight, and feels at none. Oh! the joy

Cowper, Tirocinium, 296. Of young ideas painted on the mind, In the warm glowing colours fancy spreads On objects not yet known, when all is new, And all is lovely.

Hannah More, David and Goliak. I can remember, with unsteady feet, Tottering from room to room, and finding pleasure In flowers, and toys, and sweetmeats, things which long Have lost their power to please ; which when I see them, Raise only now a melancholy wish, I were the little trifler once again Who could be pleas'd so lightly.

Southey, Thalaba. What is youth 2-a dancing billow, Winds behind, and rocks before !

Wordsworth.

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YOUTH-continued.

Ah who, when fading of itself away,
Would cloud the sunshine of his little day !
Now is the May of life. Careering round,
Joy wings his feet, joys lift him from the ground !

Rogers, Human Life.
Let them exult! their laugh and song
Are rarely known to last too long;
Why should we strive, with cynic frown,
To knock their fairy castles down.

Eliza Cuok. Live that thy young and glowing breast' Can think of death without a sigh, And be assured that life is best Which finds us least afraid to die.

Eliza Cook. There is nothing can equal the tender hours When life is first in bloom, When the heart like a bee, in a wild of flowers, Finds everywhere perfume ; When the present is all and it questions not If those flowers shall pass away, But pleas'd with its cwn delightful lot, Dreams never of decay.

MS

ZEAL, ZEALOTS— see Bigotry, Faith, Saints.

Zeal and duty are not slow;
But on occasion's forelock watchful wait. Milton, P.R. 111.172.

His zeal
None seconded, as out of season judg’d,
Or singular and rash.

Milton, P. L. v. 849.
No seared conscience is so fell
As that, which has been burn'd with zeal ;
For Christian charity's as well
A great impediment to zeal,
As zeal's a pestilent disease
To Christian charity and peace. Butler, Misc. Thoughts.
Easy still it proves, in factious times,
With public zeal to cancel private crimes.

Drylen, Absalom und Achitophel, 1. 180.

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A Synopsis of all the Coniferous Plants at present

known.

WITH DESCRIPTIONS, HISTORY & SYNONYMS,

AND A COMPREHENSIVE SYSTEMATIC INDEX.

BY GEORGE GORDON, F.L.S.

Formerly Superintendent of the Horticultural Gardens, Chiswick.

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New Edition.

CONSIDERABLY ENLARGED, INCORPORATING THE FORMER SUPPLE-
MENT, AND INCLUDING AN INDEX OF THE POPULAR NAMES

OF CONIFERÆ, ENGLISH AND FOREIGN.

TO WHICH IS NOW ADDED

In Alphabetical Reference List of all the Coloured Plates of Genus Pinus

published in the great works of Lambert, Lawson and Forbes.

BY HENRY G. BOHN, F.L.S., F.R.H.S., F.R.G.S., ETC.

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:

LONDON:
SOLD BY THE PUBLISHERS OF THE PRESENT VOLUME

AND BY

SIMPKIN, MARSHALL & CO., Stationers' Hall Court.

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