Life of Lady Jane Grey

Front Cover
Digital Antiquaria, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 148 pages
Tragic account of King Henry VIII's niece - first cousin of both Queen "Bloody Mary" and her half sister Queen Elizabeth I. Few people remember that Lady Jane Grey was Queen of England for nine days - until she abdicated in favor of Mary, Queen of Scots. She was beheaded at the Tower of London.

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Contents

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Popular passages

Page 54 - and tell you a truth which,- perchance, ye will marvel at. One of the greatest benefits that ever God gave me, is, that he sent me so sharp and severe parents, and so gentle a schoolmaster. For when I am in presence...
Page 54 - I wise, all their sport in the park is but a shadow to that pleasure that I find in Plato. Alas ! good folk, they never felt what true pleasure meant.
Page 67 - the innocency of childhood, the beauty of youth, the solidity of middle, the gravity of old age, and all at eighteen ; the birth of a princess, the learning of a clerk, the life of a saint, yet the death of a malefactor, for her parent's offences.
Page 54 - Elmer, who teacheth me, so gently, so pleasantly, with such fair allurements to learning, that I think all the time nothing, whiles I am with him. And when I am called from him, I fall on weeping, because, whatsoever I do else, but learning, is full of grief, trouble, fear, and whole misliking unto me.
Page 72 - Rather do thou walk with him, ride with him, play with him, be his faery, his page, his everything that love and poetry have invented ; but watch him well ; sport with his fancies ; turn them about like the ringlets round his cheek; and if ever he meditate on power, go toss up thy baby to his brow, and bring back his thoughts into his heart by the music of thy discourse. Teach him to live unto God and unto thee ; and he will discover that women, like the plants in woods, derive their softness and...
Page 71 - I sincerely love the youth who hath espoused me ; I love him with the fondest, the most solicitous affection ; I pray to the Almighty for his goodness and happiness, and do forget at times, unworthy supplicant ! the prayers I should have offered for myself. Never fear that I will disparage my kind religious teacher, by disobedience to my husband in the most trying duties.
Page 54 - I am in presence either of father or mother, whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand, or go, eat, drink, be merry or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing or doing anything else, I must do it, as it were, in such weight, measure and number, even...
Page 135 - God ? Far be that from me. I am thy workmanship, created in Christ Jesus. Give me grace, therefore, to tarry thy leisure, and patiently to bear thy works, assuredly knowing, that as thou canst, so thou wilt, deliver me, when it shall please thee, nothing doubting or mistrusting thy goodness towards me ; for thou knowest better what is good for me than I do : therefore do with me in all things what thou wilt, and plague me what way thou wilt.

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