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SOME NOTABLE BANKERS IN Fiction.

PAGE 1.-Balzac's Bankers

139 II.-Thackeray's Newcomes

147 III.-Bulwer's "Crawford”

150 IV.—Dickens's Bankers

152 V.—Dumas’ “Danglars”

158 VI.—Charles Reade's Story of “An Old Bank”... 160 VII.—The Rothschilds in Literature

172 VIII.-Miss Mulock's “Run on the Bank”...

186 IX.-A Meredith Creation

188 X.-Ibsen's “Helmer”

190 XI.–Stockton's “J. Weatherby Stull”

201 XII.-Paul Leicester Ford's "Mr. Blodgett"

207 XIII.--Westcott's “David Harum”

211 XIV.—Thomas Nelson Page's “Norman Wentworth” 214 XV.—John Law in “The Mississippi Bubble”

222 XVI.—Mrs. Ward's Country Banker

232 XVII.-F. Hopkinson Smith's "Peter"

235

CONCLUSION.

The Ideal Banker

239 I

HISTORICAL SIDELIGHTS ON

BANKS AND BANKERS

PART I

HISTORICAL SIDELIGHTS

IF
F we would begin with the beginning of the

literature of banking, we must go back to the

Chinese, with whom so many good things originated.

The first known work on finance is "The Examination of Currency,” by the Chinese banker, Ma-twan-lin, published in 1321. In the highly poetical language of the Flowery Kingdom, bank notes were by him called “flying money.” Some of us still find the term singularly appropriate!

Marco Polo, in the thirteenth century, and Sir John Mandeville, in the fourteenth, pioneers in the literature of travel, tell of the fiat money banker, Kublai Khan, showing that the autocrat of the East anticipated our modern fiatists by nearly seven centuries. Polo quaintly adds to his description: “Now you have heard the ways and means whereby the great Khan may have, and, in fact, has, more treasure than all the kings in the world.”

Naturally enough, this fiat system of financing an empire and its emperor led to abuses. Mandeville, who followed Polo to Tartary, says:

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