Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 1 - 10 of 50 on Whatsoever we imagine is finite. Therefore there is no idea or conception of anything....
" Whatsoever we imagine is finite. Therefore there is no idea or conception of anything we call infinite. No man can have in his mind an image of infinite magnitude nor conceive infinite swiftness, infinite time, or infinite force, or infinite power. When... "
Introduction to the Literature of Europe: In the Fifteenth, Sixteenth and ... - Page 276
by Henry Hallam - 1839
Full view - About this book

Nature and Her Laws: As Applicable to the Happiness of Man, Living ..., Volume 2

Paul Henri Thiry Holbach (baron d') - Materialism - 1834
...can never in any manner comprehend, because he is himself finite. Hobbes in his Leviathan, says : " whatsoever we imagine, is finite. Therefore, there is no idea, or conception of any thiug we call infinite. No man can have in his mind an image of infinite magnitude ; nor conceive infmite...
Full view - About this book

Literary remains of the late William Hazlitt. With a notice of his life, by ...

William Hazlitt - 1836
...imagination is too important, and has laid the foundation of too many speculations, to bo passed over. " Whatsoever we imagine is finite. Therefore there is...thing we call infinite. No man can have in his mind an imago of infinite magnitude ; nor conceive infinite swiftness, infinite time, or infinito force, or...
Full view - About this book

The System of Nature, Or, Laws of the Moral and Physical World

Paul Henri Thiry Holbach (baron d') - Materialism - 1836 - 368 pages
...can never in any manner comprehend, because he is himself finite.* * Hobbes, in his Leviathan, says : "Whatsoever we imagine, is finite. Therefore there is no idea, or conception of any thing we call nfinite. No man can have in his mind an image of infinite magnitude, nor conceive infinite swiftness,...
Full view - About this book

The English Works of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, Volume 3

Thomas Hobbes - Philosophy - 1839
...faculties may be improved to such a height, as to distinguish men from all other living creatures. Whatsoever we imagine is finite. Therefore there is...call infinite. No man can have in his mind an image infinite, of infinite magnitude ; nor conceive infinite swiftness, infinite time, or infinite force,...
Full view - About this book

Introduction to the literature of Europe in the 15th, 16th, and ..., Volume 2

Henry Hallam - Literature, Modern - 1854
...Leviavnconceiv than he adds, what is a very leading principle in •blenessof , , ., rf rr 1.1. U , I 1nanity. the philosophy of Hobbes, but seems to have no particular...finite ; therefore there is no idea or conception of anything we call infinite. No man can have in his mind an image of infinite magnitude, nor conceive...
Full view - About this book

A Defence of the Faith

Sanderson Robins - 1862
...very different school, says, consistently enough, in the last chapter of the Leviathan, " Whatever we imagine is finite; therefore there is no idea or conception of anything we call infinite. No man can have in his mind an image of infinite magnitude, nor conceive...
Full view - About this book

A Defence of the Faith

1862
...very different school, says, consistently enough, in the last chapter of the Leviathan, " Whatever we imagine is finite; therefore there is no idea or conception of anything we call infinite. No man can have in his mind an image of infinite magnitude, nor conceive...
Full view - About this book

The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine

Great Britain - 1870
...faculties may be improved to such a height as to distinguish men from all other living creatures." " Whatsoever we imagine is finite. Therefore there is no idea or conception of anything we call infinite " — we have " no conception of the thing but of our own inability. And...
Full view - About this book

The Life of John Locke, Volume 2

Henry Richard Fox Bourne - 1876
...same faculties may be improved to such a height as to distinguish men from all other living creatures. Whatsoever we imagine is finite. Therefore there is no idea or conception of anything we call infinite. No man can have in his mind an image of infinite magnitude, nor conceive...
Full view - About this book

Leviathan; Or, The Matter, Form and Power of a Commonwealth, Ecclesiastical ...

Thomas Hobbes - Political science - 1886 - 320 pages
...faculties may be improved to such a height, as to distinguish men from all other living creatures. Whatsoever we imagine is "finite." Therefore there...infinite." No man can have in his mind an image of infmite magnitude ; nor conceive infinite swiftness, infinite time, or infinite force, or infmite power....
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF