The Rise and Progress of Religious Life in England, Volume 36

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Jackson, Walford, and Hodder, 1864 - England - 368 pages

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Page 366 - But go thou thy way till the end be: for thou shalt rest, and stand in thy lot at the end of the days.
Page 273 - For I reckon that the sufferings of the present time, are not worthy to be compared with the glory, which shall be revealed in us.
Page 231 - ... not that I speak in respect of want; for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content. I know both how to be abased, and I know how to abound ; every where and in all things I am instructed both to be full and to be hungry, both to abound and to suffer need.
Page 51 - For the Lord shall comfort Zion: he will comfort all her waste places; and he will make her wilderness like Eden, and her desert like the garden of the Lord; joy and gladness shall be found therein, thanksgiving, and the voice of melody.
Page 205 - Ferrar, and tell him, he shall find in it a picture of the many spiritual conflicts that have passed betwixt God and my soul, before I could subject mine to the will of Jesus, my Master in whose service I have now found perfect freedom ; desire him to read it ; and then, if he can think it may turn to the advantage of any dejected poor soul, let it be made public ; if not, let him burn it ; for I and it are less than the least of God's mercies.
Page 344 - Paschal Lamb ! by God appointed, All our sins on Thee were laid : By Almighty love anointed, Thou hast full atonement made. All Thy people are forgiven Through the virtue of Thy blood ; Opened is the gate of heaven ; Peace is made 'twixt man and God.
Page 236 - But above all, he excelled in prayer. The inwardness and weight of his spirit, the reverence and solemnity of his address and behaviour, and the fewness and fulness of his words, have often struck even strangers with admiration, as they used to reach others with consolation. The most awful, living, reverent frame I ever felt or beheld, I must say, was his in prayer.
Page 162 - O eloquent, just, and mighty Death! whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded; what none hath dared, thou hast done; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised: thou hast drawn together all the far-stretched greatness, all the pride, cruelty, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words, Hie jacet.
Page 163 - Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That, in the course of justice, none of us Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy.
Page 123 - It was wonderful," says Strype, " to see with what joy this book of God was received, not only among the learneder sort, and those that were noted for lovers of the Reformation, but generally all England over, among all the vulgar and common people ; and with what greediness God's word was read, and what resort to places where the reading of it was.

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