The Living Age ..., Volume 81

Front Cover
Littell, Son, 1864
 

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Page 434 - Count each affliction, whether light or grave, God's messenger sent down to thee ; do thou With courtesy receive him ; rise and bow ; And, ere his shadow pass thy threshold, crave Permission first his heavenly feet to lave ; Then lay before him all thou hast ; allow No cloud of passion to usurp thy brow, Or mar thy hospitality ; no wave Of mortal tumult to obliterate The soul's marmoreal calmness : Grief should be Like joy, majestic, equable, sedate ; Confirming, cleansing, raising, making free ;...
Page 263 - That fly th' approach of morn. Alas ! regardless of their doom The little victims play ! No sense have they of ills to come Nor care beyond to-day : Yet see how all around them wait The ministers of human fate And black Misfortune's baleful train ! Ah show them where in ambush stand To seize their prey, the...
Page 249 - But when they deliver you up, take no thought how or what ye shall speak: for it shall be given you in that same hour what ye shall speak. For it is not ye that speak, but the Spirit of your Father which speaketh in you.
Page 482 - Lord, what a change within us one short hour Spent in thy presence will prevail to make ! What heavy burdens from our bosoms take ! What parched grounds refresh as with a shower ! We kneel, and all around us seems to lower ; We rise ; and all, the distant and the near, Stands forth in sunny outline, brave and clear. We kneel, how weak ! we rise, how full of power...
Page 34 - This is the month, and this the happy morn Wherein the Son of Heaven's Eternal King Of wedded maid and virgin mother born, Our great redemption from above did bring...
Page 131 - You would have thought the very windows spake, So many greedy looks of young and old Through casements darted their desiring eyes Upon his visage ; and that all the walls, With painted imagery, had said at once, — Jesu preserve thee ! welcome, Bolingbroke ! Whilst he, from one side to the other turning, Bare-headed, lower than his proud steed's neck, Bespake them thus, — I thank you, countrymen: And thus still doing, thus he pass'd along.
Page 33 - Ah me! how quick the days are flitting! I mind me of a time that's gone, When here I'd sit, as now I'm sitting. In this same place — but not alone. A fair young form was nestled near me. A dear, dear face looked fondly up, And sweetly spoke and smiled to cheer me — There's no one now to share my cup.
Page 150 - Truth, for its own sake, had never been a virtue with the Roman clergy. Father Newman informs us that it need not, and on the whole ought not to be; that cunning is the weapon which heaven has given to the Saints wherewith to withstand the brute male force of the wicked world which marries and is given in marriage. Whether his notion be doctrinally correct or not, it is at least . historically so.
Page 23 - Might she sleep in peace — might she sleep in peace; and we, too, when our struggles and pains are over! But the earth is the Lord's as the heaven is; we are alike His creatures here and yonder. I took a little flower...
Page 17 - ... pretension, imposture ; your tenderness for the weak, the poor, the oppressed, the unhappy. To the best of his means and ability he comments on all the ordinary actions and passions of life almost. He takes upon himself to be the week-day preacher, so to speak. Accordingly, as he finds, and speaks, and feels the truth best, we regard him, esteem him — sometimes love him. And as his business is to mark other people's lives and peculiarities, we moralize upon his life when he is gone, and yesterday's...

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