A Selection of Some of the Most Interesting Narratives, Or the Outrages Committed by the Indians in Their Wars with the White People: Also, an Account of Their Manners, Customs, Traditions, Religious Sentiments, Mode of Warfare, Military Tactics, Discipline and Encampments, Treatment of Prisoners, &c. which are Better Explained, and More Minutely Related, Than Has Been Heretofore Done, by Any Other Author on that Subject ; Many of the Articles Have Never Appeared in Print; The Whole Compiled from the Best Authorities, Volume 1

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From the Press of A. Loudon (Whitehall), 1811 - Indian captivities
 

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Page 209 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, 'Logan is the friend of white men.
Page 2 - BBOWN, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit : " Sertorius : or, the Roman Patriot.
Page 221 - And when Boaz had eaten and drunk, and his heart was merry, he went to lie down at the end of the heap of corn: and she came softly, and uncovered his feet, and laid her down.
Page 233 - ... feet altitude, though now reduced by the plough to seven and a half, having been under cultivation about a dozen years. Before this it was covered with trees of twelve inches diameter, and round the base was an excavation of five feet depth and width, from whence the earth had been taken of which the hillock was formed.
Page 232 - Some ascribed them to the custom, said to prevail among the Indians, of collecting, at certain periods, the bones of all their dead, wheresoever deposited at the time of death.
Page 246 - We were overpowered by numbers; but it is no more than justice to observe that, though composed of so many different species of troops, the utmost harmony prevailed through the whole army during the campaign.
Page 209 - Among these were unfortunately ( 208 ) the family of Logan, a chief celebrated in peace and war, and long distinguished as the friend of the whites. This unworthy return provoked his vengeance. He accordingly signalized himself in the war which ensued. In the autumn of the same year a decisive battle was fought at the mouth of the Great Kahnaway, between the collected forces of the Shawanese, Mingoes and Delawares, and a detachment of the Virginia militia.
Page 209 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance : for my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan ? — Not one...
Page 244 - The Indians instantly gave way, and were driven back three or four hundred yards; but for want of a sufficient number of riflemen to pursue this advantage, they soon returned, and the troops were obliged to give back in their turn.
Page 311 - Some years ago the Shawano Indians, being obliged to remove from their habitations, in their way took a Muskohge warrior known by the name of old Scrany, prisoner; they bastinadoed him severely, and condemned him to the fiery torture.

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