Belgravia, Volume 25

Front Cover
Willmer & Rogers, 1875
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 48 - Tis given out that, sleeping in my orchard, A serpent stung me; so the whole ear of Denmark Is by a forged process of my death Rankly abus'd; but know, thou noble youth, The serpent that did sting thy father's life Now wears his crown.
Page 70 - I am a solitary, and cannot impart it; till I am known, and do not want it. I hope it is no very cynical asperity not to confess obligations where no benefit has been received, or to...
Page 70 - ... Seven years, My Lord, have now passed since I waited in your outward rooms or was repulsed from your door, during which time I have been pushing on my work through difficulties of which it is useless to complain, and have brought it at last to the verge of publication without one act of assistance, one word of encouragement, or one smile of favour. Such treatment I did not expect, for I never had a patron before.
Page 3 - Admired Miranda ! Indeed the top of admiration ; worth What's dearest to the world ! Full many a lady I have eyed with best regard ; and many a time The harmony of their tongues hath into bondage Brought my too diligent ear : for several virtues Have I liked several women ; never any With so full soul, but some defect in her Did quarrel with the noblest grace she owed, And put it to the foil : but you, O you, So perfect, and so peerless, are created Of every creature's best.
Page 503 - Cuckolds all awry,' 2 the old dance of England. Of the ladies that danced, the Duke of Monmouth's mistress, and my Lady Castlemaine, and a daughter of Sir Harry de Vicke's," were the best. The manner was, when the King dances, all the ladies in the room, and the Queen herself, stand up : and indeed he dances rarely, and much better than the Duke of York.
Page 126 - Remember the old man, and what he was Years after he had heard this heavy news. His bodily frame had been from youth to age Of an unusual strength.
Page 154 - But you will go on working ?' exclaims Editha, with a surprised look ; ' your ambition is not dead ?' His only answer for the moment is a sigh. ' Progress is a grand word,' he says at last. ' but how few they are who have the elements of progress in their nature ! To go up like a rocket and come down like a stick seems the natural tendency of human genius. Bulwer Lytton, the most varied genius since Shakespeare, is the only man I can think of at this moment whose power was always growing.
Page 65 - He either fears his fate too much, Or his deserts are small. Who dares not put it to the touch, To win or lose it all.
Page 299 - I had died for this last year, to know You loved me. Who shall turn on fate ? I care not if love come or go Now, though your love seek mine for mate, It is too late.
Page 504 - So in our court in Queen Elizabeth's time gravity and state were kept up. In King James's time things were pretty well. But in King Charles's time there has been nothing but Trenchmore and the cushion dance, omnium gatherum, tolly polly, hoite cum toite.

Bibliographic information