A New Reader of the Old South: Major Stories, Tales, Slave Narratives, Diaries, Travelogues, Poetry and Songs, 1820-1920

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Ben Forkner, Patrick H. Samway
Peachtree Publishers, 1991 - History - 644 pages
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The literary Canon of the old South is redefined in this remarkable companion to the highly acclaimed A Modern Southern Reader.
The literary canon of the old South is redefined in this remarkable companion to the highly acclaimed A Modern Southern Reader. Editors Ben Forkner and Patrick Samway, S. J. have selected from the most original and lasting works of nineteenth-century Southern writing (1820-1920) to reflect the full range of the Southern experience.
The thorough introduction illuminates the individual pieces, providing insight into the culture of the Old South, from which rose a new generation of prominent, American writers. Features the work of Kate Chopin, Frederick Douglass, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Ellen Glasgow, Henry Grady, Joel Chandler Harris, Thomas Jefferson, James Weldon Johnson, Sidney Lanier, Augustus Baldwin Longstreet, Edgar Allen Poe, Mark Twain, and many others.

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Contents

A Plantation Echo
106
The Edisto Raftsman
122
Selections from Slave Narratives and Diaries
131
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

BEN FORKNER is professor of English and American literature at the University of Angers in France. A graduate of Stetson University in Florida, he received his Ph.D. from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has published essays on writers from Ireland and the American South and has edited several anthologies including Georgia Stories, and with Patrick Samway, S. J., A Modern Southern Reader and A New Reader of the Old South.

PATRICK SAMWAY, S. J. received his B.A. and M.A. from Fordham University, his M.Div. from Woodstock College, and his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Father Samway taught for eight years at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, New York, and also has received two Fulbright lectureships to France, in addition to having been a Bannan Fellow at the University of Santa Clara in California and Visiting Associate Professor at both Boston College and Loyola University in New Orleans.

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