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CONTENTS.

CHAP. II.--ÆSTHETIC EMOTIONS.--EMOTIONS OF BEAUTY.

17. Characteristics of emotions of beauty.

18. Of what is meant by beautiful objects.

19. Of the distinction between beautiful and other objects.

20. Grounds or occasions of emotions of beauty various..

44

46

46

48
CHAP. V.--NATURE OF INTELLECTUAL TASTE.

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CHAP. III.-ASSOCIATED BEAUTY.

39. Associated beauty implies an antecedent or intrinsic beauty.. 75

40. Objects may become beautiful by association merely..

76

41. Further illustrations of associated feelings..

77

42. Instances of national associations.

79

43. The sources of associated beauty coincident with those of hu-

man happiness

80

44. Of fitness considered as an element of associated beauty. 81.

45. Of utility as an element of associated beauty..

82

46. Of proportion as an element of associated beauty.

83

47. Relation of emotions of beauty to the fine arts..

85

48. Differences of original susceptibility of this emotion.

86

49. Objection to the doctrine of original beauty...

86

50. Summary of views in regard to the beautiful.

88

51. Of picturesque beauty..

89

CHAP. IV.-ÆSTHETIC EMOTIONS. EMOTIONS OF SUBLIMITY.

52. Connexion between beauty and sublimity.....

90

53. The occasions of the emotions of sublimity various.

91

54. Great extent or expansion an occasion of sublimity

92

55. Great height an element or occasion of sublimity..

93

56. Of depth in connexion with the sublime..

93

57. Of colours in connexion with the sublime.

94

58. Of sounds as furnishing an occasion of sublime emotions 95

59. Of motion in connexion with the sublime....

96

60. Indications of power accompanied by emotions of the sublime 97

61. Of moral worth in connexion with sublimity..

98

62. Sublime objects have some elements of beauty.

99

63. Emotions of grandeur.

100

64. Of the original or primary sublimity of objects..

100

65. Considerations in proof of the original sublimity of objects.. 101

66. Influence of association on emotions of sublimity.

102

67. Further illustrations of sublimity from association.

103

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68. Definition of taste, and some of its characteristics.

104

69. Distinguishable from mere quickness of feeling or sensibility. 105

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106. Of the general nature and characteristics of the appetites... 144

107. The appetites necessary to our preservation, and not original-

ly of a selfish character..

145

108. Of the prevalence and origin of appetites for intoxicating

drugs..

146

109. Of occasional desires for action and repose.

146

110. Of the twofold operation and the morality of the appetites.. 147

CHAP. IV.-PROPENSITIES.

111. General remarks on the nature of the propensities

148

112. Principle of self-preservation, or the desire of continued ex-

istence..

149

113. Of the twofold action of the principle of self-preservation... 150

114. Of curiosity, or the desire of knowledge....

151

115. Further illustrations of the principle of curiosity.

152

116. Of the twofold operation and the morality of the principle of

curiosity..

154

117. Imitativeness, or the propensity to imitation.

155

118. Practical results of the principle of imitation.

156

119. Of emulation considered as a propensive principle.

158

120. Of approbativeness or the desire of esteem..

158

121. Of approbativeness or the desire of esteem as a rule of con-

duct..

160

122. Of acquisitiveness, or the desire of possession..

161

123. Of the moral character of the possessory principle.

162

124. Of perversions of the possessory desire.

164

125. Of the desire of power..

164

126. Facts in proof of the natural desire of

power

165

127. Of the moral character of the desire of power.

167

128. Veracity, or the propensity to utter the truth.

167

129. Of the twofold action of the propensity to truth.

168

130. Propensity of self-love, or the desire of happiness.

169

131, Of selfishness as distinguished from self-love..

1771

132. Modifications of selfishness; pride, vanity, and arrogance... 171

133. Reference to the opinions of philosophical writers..

173

CHAP. V.-PROPENSITIES CONTINUED.-SOCIALITY, OR THE DESIRE

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CHAP. VII.—THE BENEVOLENT AFFECTIONS.

164. Of the nature of love, or benevolence in general..

208

165. Love, in its various forms, characterized by a twofold ac-

tion..

209

166. Of the parental affection..

210

167. Illustrations of the strength of the parental affection. 211

168. Of the filial affection..

212

169. The filial affection original or implanted..

213

170. Illustrations of the filial affection..

215

171. Of the nature of the fraternal affection.

217

172. Of the utility of the domestic affections.

218

173. Of the moral character of the domestic affections, and of the

benevolent affections generally..

219

174. Of the moral character of the voluntary exercise of the be-

nevolent affections...

221

175. Of the connexion between benevolence and rectitude. 222

176. Of humanity, or the love of the human race...

223

177. Further proofs in support of the doctrine of an innate hu-

manity, or love of the human race.

225

178. Proofs of a humane or philanthropic principle from the exist-

ence of benevolent institutions..

227

179. Other remarks in proof of the same doctrine..

229

180. Objection from the contests and wars among mankind... 231

181. The objection, drawn from wars, further considered.

233

182. Illustration of the statements of the foregoing section. 234

183. Of patriotism, or love of country..

236

184. Of the affection of friendship...

237

185. Of the affection of pity, or sympathy

239

186. Of the moral character of pity..

240

187. Of the affection of gratitude..

241

CHAP. VIII.-THE BENEVOLENT AFFECTIONS.--LOVE TO THE SU-

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