Machintosh's collection of Gaelic proverbs, and familiar phrases: Englished a-new. To which is added, "The way to wealth," by Benjamin Franklin, L.L.D.

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W. Stewart, 1819 - Proverbs, Scottish Gaelic - 239 pages

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Page 216 - By hearing ye shall hear, and shall not understand, and seeing ye shall see, and shall not perceive.
Page 221 - What though you have found no treasure, nor has any rich relation left you a legacy, Diligence is the mother of good luck, and God gives all things to industry. Then plough deep while sluggards sleep, and you shall have corn to sell and to keep.
Page 228 - ... blessing of heaven; and therefore ask that blessing humbly, and be not uncharitable to those that at present seem to want it, but comfort and help them. Remember Job suffered, and was afterwards prosperous. 'And now, to conclude, " experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other...
Page 223 - A little neglect may breed great mischief; for want of a nail the shoe was lost, for want of a shoe the horse was lost, and for want of a horse the rider was lost, being overtaken and slain by the enemy; all for want of a little care about a horseshoe nail.
Page 221 - He that hath a trade, hath an estate ; and he that hath a calling, hath an office of profit and honor," as poor Richard says ; but then the trade must be worked at, and the calling well followed, or neither the estate nor the office will enable us to pay our taxes. If we are industrious, we shall never starve ; for, " at the working man's house, hunger looks in, but dares not enter.
Page 223 - And again, The eye of a master will do more work than both his hands; and again, Want of care does us more damage than want of knowledge; and again, Not to oversee workmen, is to leave them your purse open. Trusting too much to others...
Page 220 - But dost thou love life, then do not squander time, for that is the stuff life is made of, as Poor Richard says. How much more than is necessary do we spend in sleep, forgetting that The sleeping fox catches no poultry, and that There will be sleeping enough in the grave, as Poor Richard says.
Page 226 - We are offered by the terms of this sale six months' credit; and that perhaps has induced some of us to attend it, because we cannot spare the ready money, and hope now to be fine without it. But ah! think what you do when you run in debt: you give to another power over your liberty. If you cannot pay at the time, you will be ashamed to see your creditor; you will be in fear when you speak to him; you will make poor, pitiful, sneaking excuses, and by degrees come to lose your veracity and sink into...
Page 224 - These are not the Necessaries of Life; they can scarcely be called the Conveniences, and yet only because they look Pretty, how many want to have them. The artificial Wants of Mankind thus become more numerous than the natural ; and as Poor Dick says, For one poor person, there are a hundred indigent.
Page 224 - What maintains one vice would bring up two children. You may think perhaps that a little tea, or a little punch now and then, diet a little more costly, clothes a little finer, and a little entertainment now and then, can be no great matter ; but remember, Many a little makes a mickle. Beware of little expenses : A small leak will sink a great ship, as Poor Richard says ; and again, Who dainties love, shall beggars prove ; and moreover, Fools make feasts and wise men eat them.

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