Page images
PDF
EPUB

FRENCH

CONVERSATION-READER

ARRANGED ON AN ENTIRELY NEW PLAN, WITH QUESTIONS

AND ANSWERS

for the Use of Schools and Pribate Students.

BY

CHARLES HENRI SCHNEIDER, F.E.I.S. M.C.P.
FRENCH MASTER IN THE HIGH SCHOOL, THE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND WATT'S
INSTITUTION, THE MERCHANT-MAIDEN INSTITUTION, ETC.; FRENCH
EXAMINER TO THE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE OF SCOTLAND,

MEMBER OF THE COLLEGE OF PRECEPTORS.

[graphic]

EIGHTEENTH EDITION.

EDINBURGH:
OLIVER AND BOYD, TWEEDDALE COURT.

LONDON : SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND CO.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

MR SCHNEIDER'S OTHER CLASS-BOOKS.

THE EDINBURGH HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH CONVER

SATION-GRAMMAR, arranged on an entirely New Plan, with Questions and Answers in French. 18th Edition. Dedicated, by permission, to Professor Max Müller. 3s. 6d. Key, 2s. 6d. Letter from PROFESSOR Max MÜLLER, University of Oxford, May 1867.

“MY DEAR SIR.—I am very happy to find that my anticipations as to the success of your Grammar have been fully realized. Your work does not require any longer a godfather; but if you wish me to act as such, I shall be most happy to have my name connected with your prosperous child.-Yours very truly,

MAX MÜLLER. “To Mons. C. H. Schneider, Edinburgh High School.”

THE EDINBURGH HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH MANUAL

of CONVERSATION and COMMERCIAL CORRESPONDENCE. 8th Edition. 2s. 6d. ÉCRIN LITTÉRAIRE; or, Collection of LIVELY ANECDOTES,

JEUX DE Mots, ENIGMAS, CHARADES, POETRY, etc., to serve as Readings, Dictation, and Recitation. 3s. 6d.

PRINTED BY OLIVER AND BOYD, EDINBURG:L

PREFACE.

In preparing this book my great aim has been to render it both useful and interesting ; the plan is entirely new, and will, I trust, be found thoroughly practical.

French has now become in Great Britain an indispensable part of education, and, consequently, more pains should be taken by teachers to make the learning of it as easy and as simple as possible; I have endeavoured, therefore, to smooth the way, and give to the student of French a liking for the language from the very beginning.

The pieces are carefully selected, in a moral point of view, and special attention has been bestowed upon their arrangement, so that they may advance in difficulty in proportion to the student's progressive proficiency.

The plan of the work is this :

The First Part contains a key to French pronunciation, and the method adopted is to give the pupil a letter or word in the English language corresponding with the French sound required. By experience I know that this is a great assistance to the memory of the pupil.

To facilitate the reading of the Second Part, all the letters which are not sounded are printed in Italics, and this mark v shows the junction of two words. Numbers are also placed above certain words referring to the rule which they come under in the key of pronunciation. In this and in the Fourth Part there are appended about one thousand questions, which being put at the end of each lesson gradually initiate the pupil into French conversation.

In the Sixth and Seventh Parts will be found a choice selection of pieces from the best French poets.

The last part consists of a vocabulary and a collection of idiomatic phrases. A novel feature of this work is, that the different parts of the verb are represented by numbers ; so that when the pupil wishes to know the part of any verb, he has merely to call to mind what Tense the number found beside it represents. For example : Suppose in reading you meet the word Diraient, you will find it in the Vocabulary followed by number 8 (which represents the Conditional), along with the infinitive in French and the meaning; this will enable the pupil not only to prepare his lesson with ease, but to parse from the very beginning.

Throughout the work, explanatory notes will be found at the bottom of the pages to assist the pupil to an intelligent reading of the different pieces.

In conclusion, the author sincerely hopes that the method in which the matter has been arranged, will be found to be satisfactory to the Teacher, and advantageous to the Pupil,—two essential points, which, if gained, will amply compensate him for the trouble he has taken.

High ScHOOL OF EDINBURGH.

« PreviousContinue »