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INDEX TO VOL. XVIIJ.

H.
PAGR.

PAG%.
Ancient History, Study of W. C. Car. Humility, Poetry..

205
pentr..

218 Holy Bi íc, Square and Compasses...... 209
Anti-Masonry Revived, N Y. Dispatch. 222 Home, Happiness of

233
Arts of Wasting 'Time
231 Homc, its Bliss, JareM Jackson...

.... 235
Andrers of M. W. P. G. M B. B French. 1 Aigh r Life, Pas: ed to, Poetry, H M. R. 20
Address of Rev. L L. Rogers, of Fenton 101 H art Graves, t'oetry.....

119
Ancient History, W. Carpenter... 18. High Degree, Puetry..

121
Appoin mint-, Masinic List of, in III ...
Antagonism to Masonry....

251
Anciont History..

258

I.
A Vasonic Flag..

261
Air Goog..

284

In Hoc Signo Vinces...
Inebriety in a Judge

39
Imposter Described..

83
B.

J.
brotherly Love, Rev. J. C. Patteo...

197
Boyhood Days, Ed.........
240 Jerusalem, Masonry in.

26
Beginnings, $mall..

31

John the Evange.iet...
Beecher, H. W. an L B...

32
Jurisdiction, Ed...

84
Ballot..

73
Janceville Grape....

141
Bruco, Robert, as a Mason...

156
Bible, Square and Compasses, Ed. 184

K.
Black-ball, how to Use.....

190
Benevolent Aesociations
Masonic....,

196 Knight« Templars Vindicated........

L.
C.

Love and Fear as Motives, Ruskin....... 288
Courtesies, Masonic, B. Lumbort........ 236 Light, Masonic, significance of...

1T0
Choico, Power of a Right
40 Landmarks

150
Colored Masons of Ohio
48 Landscape Paintings...

262
Confession of an Attorney ....... 123 Let Us Üelp one another.

271
Contentment, us. Plenty, 8. Cobb jr...... 123
Vinil Government, Duties to, as Nasons. 166

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M.

drees.....

.. 242

D.
Maoonry, March of, an

205

Masonry, Ancient Craft......
baty, Ea...
98 Masonry not sectarian..

230
Degrees in Masonry...

163 Masonry, what do You Find in it, Ed.. 233
Masonic Jurisprudence, by Hugh McQur-

dy, GM of Michigan....
E.
Masonic Disabilities..

18
Masonic Incident...................:

34
Barth, Pullness of, Poetry, by A. F...... 19 Masonic Chronicles..

39
Brangols....
27 M 1800 y a Moral Power, Ed..

40
Jxtrat Rod uption...

Mas nic Enemies an Advantage..

40
Masonry, Beauties of....

50
F.

Masonry, Origin of. A. G Mackey.... 71

Masonry in Relation to Civil Authority.. 74
Har, Par upon the sea....
211 Masonry in Kansas..

75
Porgiviness...

219 Masonry, Myst c Emhellishment of...... 115
ster, Rev. Dr., Reference to........ 196 Masonic song, C.8 Mackensie...

....... 1:20
Fraternit es....

Masonic Ode..

1:22
276
M sonry, *diiorial..

135
Ma-onry, Female, in France, Ed.
G.
Moral Corruption, Ed...

142
Masonic Jurisprudence..

160
Grand Lodge of Michigan, Annual Com- Musonic Keproof....

179
munication of, G. M. Address........ 53 Masonic Morale.

196

140

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N.
Secret Society Defined...

216

Study of Ancient History, W. Carpenter 218
Narmater, tbe Forest Maid, Poetry...... 19 Science, Victims of....

35
Sorrow, Lodges of...

... 178. 112
0.

Scottish Rite, Progress in Chicago, Ed.. 146
Several Letters to Napoleon....

172
Oration of Jno. L. Lewis, of N. Y....... 308
Old Records.....

166
Old Way and New, Jno. B. Yates.. 176
Oration, by P. G. M. John L Lewis, N. Y 265 Truth

185. 98
Old Age
285 T'he Tongue, Poetry...

158
On the Square....

288 Three Various Symbolisins.............. 164

Truth, Lack of...
P.
The Ring my Father Wore, Poetry.

255
The Man and His Bnadow, Poetry.

204
Press, Power of, Ed..

137
The Phenicians in America...

273
Past Master Degree...

228

The “Sacred Fund," Poetry
Poor and the Gospel....

The Grand Lodge of Quebec...
33

296
Progress, Editorial...

44
Pilgrims Replics, Poetry, W. L. Gardner. 80

W.
Perjurers put to Shame.

139
Purpose, Living to, Ed.

187
Personal...

191
Watch and Turkey...

132
Providence, Manifest..

174

Wadhams, A. S., Referred to... 146. 194
Progress of Knowledge

250 What Constitutes a Practical Life..

192

........ 280

... 281

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THE MYSTIC STAR.

January--1873,

ADDRESS.

We present the following extract of an address delivered by the late M. W. P. G. M. BENJAMIN BROWN FRENCH:

“Freemasonry is an old institution. For hundreds of years tongues have been wagging and pens have been scratching in mighty efforts to enlighten the minds of men on this great subject.

A Masonic Library counts its volumes by thousands, and every conceivable view of the duties, customs, laws, and general appertainings of the noble craft, may be found without much search in good, fair print, and it requires no grand lecturer to instruct the Brotherhood outside of the prescribed formula, which is, or should be familiar to us all.

I have performed my full portion of this tongue service and pen service. I have, I fear, too often encroached on the old and able writers on Freemasonry, and, it may be, have sometimes given my listening brethren their ideas, believing them to be my own.

I desire this evening to submit to your consideration something new, and it has been a matter of no small difficulty for me to choose & theme with the hope that it may be interesting.

My own Masonic experiences and reminiscences present themselves, and taking all the risk of being subjected to the charge of egotism, I shall make them the subject of my present remarks.

I am not only an old man, but also an old Mason. I have been considerably more than forty years a member of the Order, and almost from the day of my becoming a Master in 1825-6 to this, I have been in some capacity of workmanship in the Masonic har

ness.

I shall try to give some interest to the passing hour this evening by recounting some things that I have done, and some things that I have seen during those years of craftsmanship.

A very considerable portion of my boyhood was passed in North Yarmouth (now Yarmouth), in the State of Maine. In the neigh

1. VOL. XVIII-NO. I-JAX. 1873.

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borhood where I resided dwelt a ship captain, e generous, noblehearted man, and a leading Freemason. His children attended the academy with me, and were my friends and playmates. I became intimate with his family, and came to love him as if he had been a near relative of my own. He was stricken down with consumption and died, and I can asseverate that at least one sincere mourner followed his remains to the grave.

He was buried with Masonic honors. It was the first Masonie funeral I ever witnessed, and it made an impression upon my young mind which time can never eradicate.

The white gloves and aprons, the collars anu jowels, the rods of the Stewards, reverently crossed above the uncovered heads of the brethren at every turning, the procession with all its mystic pharaphernalia, the circle around the open grave, the symbolic broken chain of fraternal affection, the depositing of the white lamb-skin apron and the evergreen, the solemn words of the Worshipful Mas ter, and the response of the surrounding brethren, the impression given of the grand honors, all, too, in honor of a man I had loved, and whose death I so sincerely mourned, had upon my feelings an effect which led me to form a resolution, standing at the side of that good man's grave, that when the first opportunity should present After I should reach man's estate, I would become a Freemason.

There probably are not many, perhaps, there is not one in the audience, who cannot carry, his memory back to some occurrence of his younger life, simple and trilling in itself, that had a marked influence on all his following existence. It is almost wonderful to trace back events of a lifetime to some circumstance or perhaps accident that hardly excited a comment or even a thought at the time, but on which was hinged in some lives the inost startling and soulstirring events. We are all the children of circumstances, and our lives hang continually upon a chance.

To return to myself, the resolution formed by me, as just stated, was not forgotten. Still four years of my manhood had passed away before it was possible for me to fulfill it.

At about the age of twenty-five I settled down in the practice oi my profession in the Town of Sutton, in New Hampshire. In the adjoining town of New London, five miles from my residence, was King Solomon's Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons. A good and worthy meinber of that Lodge resided next door to me, and I lost no time in making through him application to become a member of the Order. One month elapsed when I was duly accepted and made an entered apprentice Mason.

Among the by-laws of that good old Lodge was one providing that if an apprentice made himself so absolutely perfect in the lecture of that degree in a single month, that he could arise in the Lodge Room, and repeat it, he should be immediately passed on.

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