The poetic prism or Original and reflected rays from modern verse ed. by R.N. Greville

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Robert Northmore Greville
MacLachlan, 1848 - 403 pages

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Page 22 - Sleep soft, beloved !" we sometimes say, But have no tune to charm away Sad dreams that through the eyelids creep. But never doleful dream again. Shall break the happy slumber when He giveth His beloved, sleep.
Page 397 - BENEATH our feet and o'er our head Is equal warning given ; Beneath us lie the countless dead, Above us is the Heaven...
Page 185 - There is a Power whose care Teaches thy way along that pathless coast, — The desert and illimitable air, — Lone wandering, but not lost. All day thy wings have fanned At that far height, the cold, thin atmosphere, Yet stoop not, weary, to the welcome land, Though the dark night is near.
Page 238 - IT is a place where poets crowned may feel the heart's decaying ; It is a place where happy saints may weep amid their praying ; Yet let the grief and humbleness as low as silence languish : Earth surely now may give her calm to whom she gave her anguish.
Page 109 - He gazed at the flowers with tearful eyes, He kissed their drooping leaves ; It was for the Lord of Paradise He bound them in his sheaves. "My Lord has need of these flowerets gay," The Reaper said, and smiled ; "Dear tokens of the earth are they, Where He was once a child.
Page 28 - TREAD softly! bow the head — In reverent silence bow ! No passing bell doth toll; Yet an immortal soul Is passing now. Stranger, however great, With lowly reverence bow! There's one in that poor shed — One by that paltry bed — Greater than thou.
Page 109 - I have naught that is fair?" saith he; "Have naught but the bearded grain? Though the breath of these flowers is sweet to me, I will give them all back again." He gazed at the flowers with tearful eyes, He kissed their drooping leaves; It was for the Lord of Paradise He bound them in his sheaves.
Page 256 - UP to the throne of God is borne The voice of praise at early morn, And he accepts the punctual hymn Sung as the light of day grows dim. Nor will he turn his ear aside From holy offerings at noontide. Then here reposing let us raise A song of gratitude and praise.
Page 185 - WHITHER, midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way...

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