Select Fables of Esop and Other Fabulists: In Three Books. By R. Dodsley

Front Cover
J. Dodsley, 1765 - Aesop's fables - 204 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1 - Then said all the trees unto the bramble, Come thou, and reign over us. And the bramble said unto the trees, If in truth ye anoint me king over you, then come and put your trust in my shadow : and if not, let fire come out of the bramble, and devour the cedars of Lebanon.
Page 69 - I find, would have been concluded without an IF, had you been as ready to do justice to others as to exact it from them.
Page 60 - I cannot fail of having money enough to purchase a new gown. Green — let me consider, yes, green becomes my complexion best, and green it shall be. In this dress I will go to the fair, where all the young fellows will...
Page 56 - Miller stood corrected, and immediately took his Son up behind him. And now the next man they met exclaimed with more vehemence and indignation than all the rest — Was there ever such a couple of lazy boobies ! to overload in so unconscionable a manner, a poor dumb creature, who is far less able to carry them than they are to carry him...
Page 42 - Crow, who had built her nest in a cedar near the foot of the rock, observing what passed, was ambitious of performing the same exploit ; and darting from her nest, fixed her talons in the fleece of another lamb. But neither able to move her prey, nor to disentangle her feet, she was taken by the shepherd, and carried away for his children to play with ; who eagerly enquiring what bird it was : — An hour ago...
Page 65 - ... jovial countenance : she was attended on one hand, by a troop of cooks and bacchanals ; and on the other, by a train of wanton youths and damsels, who danced, half naked, to the softest musical instruments ; her name was INTEMPERANCE. She waved her hand, and thus addressed the...
Page 7 - THE Fox, though in general more inclined to roguery than wit, had once a strong inclination to play the wag with his neighbour the Stork. He accordingly invited her to dinner in great form ; but when it came upon the table the Stork found it consisted entirely of different soups, served up in broad shallow dishes, so that she could only dip in the end of her bill, but could not possibly satisfy her hunger. The Fox lapped it up very readily, and every now and then, addressing...
Page 11 - ... the water which I am drinking ? The poor Lamb, all trembling, replies, How, I beseech you, can that possibly be the case, since the current sets from you to me ? Disconcerted by the force of truth, he changes the accusation. Six months ago, says he, you vilely slandered me. Impossible, returns the Lamb, for I was not then born.
Page 89 - CAT having devoured her matter's favourite •**• bulfinch, overheard him threatening to put her to death the moment he could find her. In this diftrefs fhe preferred a prayer to Jupiter ; vowing, if he would deliver her from her prefent danger, that never while fhe lived would fhe eat another bird. Not long afterwards, a Bat moft invitingly flew into the room where Pufs was purring in the window. The queftion was, how to act upon fo tempting an occafion ? Her appetite prefied hard on one fide...
Page 103 - ... which he was as unable to leave as to enjoy. Clogged in his wings, enfeebled in his feet, and his whole frame...

Bibliographic information