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MAYNARD'S ENGLISH CLASSIC SERIES.–No. 102-103.

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WITH BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF MILTON AND MACAULAY, AN
EPITOME OF THE VIEWS OF THE BEST KNOWN CRITICS

OF MILTON, AND EXPLANATORY NOTES.

SELECTED.

NEW YORK:
MAYNARD, MERRILL, & Co.,

29, 31, AND 33 East NINETEENTH STREET.

C15457

JUL 1.05

Harvard Biversity
Dept. of Educatie: Library

Icf the Publishers.

A COMPLETE COURSE IN THE STUDY OF ENGLISH,

Spelling, Language, Grammar, Composition, Literature.

Reed's Word Lessons-A Complete Speller.
Reed's Introductory Language Work.
Reed & Kellogg's Graded Lessons in English,
Reed & Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English.
Reed & Kellogg's One-Book Course in English.
Kellogg & Reed's Word Building.
Kellogg & Reed's The English Language.
Kellogg's Text-Book on Rhetoric.
Kellogg's Illustrations of Style.

Kellogg's Text-Book on English Literature.

In the preparation of this series the authors have had one object
clearly in view—to so develop the study of the English language as
to present a complete, progressive course, from the Spelling-Book to
the study of English Literature, The troublesome contradictions
which arise in using books arranged by different authors on these
subjects, and which require much time for explanation in the school-
room, will be avoided by the use of the above Complete Course."

Teachers are earnestly invited to examine these books.
MAYNARD, MERRILL, & Co., PUBLISHERS,

New York.

TRANSFERRED TO
HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

Copyright, 1892, by EFFINGHAM MAYNARD & Co.

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THOMAS BABINGTON MACAULAY, whose father was Zachary Macaulay-famous for his advocacy of the abolition of slavery, was born at Rothley Temple, in Leicestershire, towards the end of 1800. From his infancy he showed a precocity that was simply extraordinary. He not only acquired knowledge rapidly, but he possessed a marvelous power of working it up into literary form, and his facile pen produced compositions in prose and in verse, histories, odes, and hymns. From the time that he was three years old he read incessantly, for the most part lying on the rug before the fire with his book on the ground, and a piece of bread and butter in his hand. It is told of him that when a boy of four, and on a visit with his father, he was unfortunate enough to have a cup of hot coffee overturned on his legs, and when his hostess, in her sympathetic kindness, asked shortly after how he was feel. ing, he looked up in her face and said, “ Thank you, madam, the agony is abated.” At seven he wrote a compendium of Universal History. At eight he was so fired with the Lay and with Mar. mion that he wrote three cantos of a poem in imitation of Scott's manner, and called it the “Battle of Cheviot.” And he had many other literary projects, in all of which he showed perfect correctness both in grammar and in spelling, made his meaning uniformly clear, and was scrupulously accurate in his punctuation.

With all this cleverness he was not conceited. His parents, and particularly his mother, were most judicious in their treatment. They never encouraged him to display his powers of conversation, and they abstained from every kind of remark that might help him to think himself different from other boys. One result was that throughont his life he was free from literary vanity; another was that he habitually overestimated the knowledge of others. When he said in his essays that every schoolboy knew

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