Annual Reports, Volume 13

Front Cover
 

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Contents

Fish weir of the Virginia Indians
14
Lse of mats in an Indian council
19
Use of mat in sleeping
20
Products of the artContinued Page
28
Section of cliff showing position of grave shelter
28
Analysis of the weaving of the fringed skirt
28
Border of bag
28
Sandal or moccasin from a Kentucky cave
29
Fine closely woven cloth preserved by contact with copper beads
36
Small portion of rush matting preserved by contact with copper
37
Fabric from the ancient pottery of Alabama
38
Twined fabric from ancient salt vessel Illinois
41
Twined fabric from a piece of clay Arkansas
42
Twined fabric from ancient pottery Tennessee
43
Twined fabric with patterns Ohio valley 27 Net from ancient pottery District of Columbia
44
Bits of fabricmarked pottery with clay casts of same
44
Net from ancient pottery North Carolina
45
Chipped stone articles Continued Page
50
Chipped flint narrow and thick 150
54
STONE ART BY GERARD FOWKE
57
Grooved ax showing groove projections
63
Grooved as showing pointed edge
64
Grooved ax showing groove entirely around
65
Grooved ax showing grooved back
66
Grooved ax showing rounded back
67
Grooved ax showing flattened curved back
68
Grooved ax Keokuk type
69
Grooved ax showing curved edge
70
Grooved adze
71
Notched ax showing polished edge
72
Celt showing blade thick near edge
73
Celt showing long slender form
74
Celt nearly round section
75
Celt showing nearly diamond section
76
Celt
77
Celt showing bellshape and roughening for handle
78
Celt showing wedgeshape
79
Celt showing halfelliptical section
81
Thin polished celt
82
Celt showing thin gougeform edge
83
Celt showing scraperform edge
85
Chipped celt
86
Hematite celt
87
Handled pestle with expanding base
88
Pestle long cylindrical form
89
Pestle
90
Cupped stone or paint cup
93
Muller showing polished surface
94
Hammerstone
95
Grooved hammer
96
Discoidal stone
100
Discoidal stone with perforation
101
Discoidal stone with secondary depression
102
Discoidal stone
103
Discoidal stone convex
104
Discoidal stone
105
Discoidal stone
106
Discoidal stone with Vshape edges
108
Discoidal pottery fragment
109
Spud
110
Spud
111
Plummet grooved near middle
112
Plummet
113
Cone
114
Hemisphere
115
Gorget
118
Gorget reelshape
119
Gorget
120
Gorget boat shape
121
Banner stone reelshape
122
Banner stone crescentshape
123
Boatshape stone
124
Pendant
125
Birdshape stone
126
Shaft rubber
127
Tube one end flattened
128
Tube hourglass form
129
Pipe
130
Pipe longstemmed
131
Chipped stone articles
132
Chipped fint large
147
Chipped flint small
148
Chipped flint small
149
Chipped iint edges concave
150
Chipped flint convex edges long tapering stem
152
Chipped flint with long tapering stem
153
Stemmed chipped flint
154
Stemmed chipped flint symmetric outline
155
Stemmed chipped flint
156
Stemmed chipped flint roughly made
157
Stemmed chipped flint with long barbs
158
Stemmed chipped flint
159
Stemmed chipped fint thin
160
Stemmed chipped Aint slender with small stem
161
Stemmed chipped flint
162
Stemmed chipped flint projecting shoulders
163
Stemmed chipped flint very rough
164
Perforator not stemmed
165
Perforator not stemmed double pointed
166
Perforator stemmed
167
Perforator stemmed with cutting point
168
Stemmed scraper
169
Stemless scraper celt form
170
Cores
171
Flake chipped for scraper
173
Flake chipped for knife or arrowhead
174
Stémmed chipped flint winged
175
Stemmed chipped flint
176
Chipped flint with sharpedged stem
177
ABORIGINAL REMAINS IN VERDE VALLEY ARIZONA BY COSMOS MINDELEFF
179
Map showing distribution of ruins and location of area treated with reference to ancient pueblo region 185
183
Sketch map site of small ruin 10 miles north of Fossil creek 200
184
Introduction 185
184
Distribution and classification of ruins
184
Plans and descriptions
187
Ground plan of ruin at mouth of the East Verde
201
Ground plan of ruin near the mouth of Fossil creek
205
Sketch map site of ruin above Fossil creek
205
Sketch map of ruin 94 miles above Fossil creek 206
205
Sketch map showing location of ruins opposite Verde 207
205
Ground plan of ruin on southern side of Clear creek 211
205
Ground plan of ruin 8 miles north of Fossil creek 213
205
Sketch map of ruins on pinnacle 7 miles north of Fossil creek 216
205
Diagram showing strata of canyon wall 218
205
Walled storage cist 221
205
Plan of cavate lodges group D 226
210
Sections of cavate lodges group D
213
Section of water pocket
214
Plan of cavate lodges group d
217
Sections of cavate lodges group A
218
Plan of cavate lodges group B
221
Plan of cavate lodges group E
222
Plan of cavate lodges group C
225
Map of an ancient irrigation ditch
239
Part of old irrigating ditch
241
Structural characteristics 248
245
Walled front cavate lodges
245
Bowlders in footway cavate lodges
245
Framed doorway cavate lodges
245
Notched doorway in Canyon de Chelly
245
Notched doorway in Tusayan
247
Conclusions
251
Page
267
Introductory note
269
Yellow Smokes earth lodge
270
Ground plan of Osage lodge
271
Omaha tent
272
Exterior parts of an Omaha tent
273
dejequdes tent
274
Furniture and implements
275
Omaha cradleplan
276
Furniture and implementsContinued Page
278
CASA GRANDE RUIN BY COSMOS MINDELEFF
295
ETH II
306
Conclusions 318
330
411
330
MythsContinued Page
330
Introductory 325
330
Myths
379
Tand
461

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Page 368 - ... to the North, the second to the West, the third to the South and the fourth to the East. By the left side of the...
Page 109 - In this month we began to make sugar. As some of the elm bark will strip at this season, the squaws, after finding a tree that would do, cut it down, and with a crooked stick, broad and sharp at the end, took the bark off the tree, and of this bark made vessels in a curious manner, that would hold about two gallons each : they made above one hundred of these kind of vessels.
Page 16 - The Indians, by reason of our supplying them so cheap with every sort of goods, have forgotten the chief part of their ancient mechanical skill, so as not to be well able now, at least for some years, to live independent of us.
Page 370 - ... that in turn mature the seeds and perfect the year in autumn. By means of this arrangement no ceremonial is ever performed and no council ever held in which there is the least doubt as to the position which a member of a given clan shall occupy in it, for according to the season in which the ceremonial is held, or according to the reason for which a council is convened, one or another of the clan groups of one or another of the regions will take precedence for the time; the natural sequence being,...
Page 23 - Jersey. \. taffs, but rolled the filaments upon their bare thighs, and made thread and strings of them, which they dyed red, yellow, black, etc., and afterwards worked them into stuffs with a great deal of ingenuity. * * * Sometimes the fishing tackle of the Indians consists entirely of this hemp.
Page 16 - I ever saw, considering their materials. They divide large swamp canes into long, thin, narrow splinters, which they dye of several colours, and manage the workmanship so well, that both the inside and outside are covered with a beautiful variety of pleasing figures, and, though for the space of two inches below the upper edge of each basket, it is worked into one, through the other parts they are worked asunder, as if they were two joined a-top by some strong cement. A large nest consists of eight...
Page 269 - The roof is supported by two series of pillars, or rough vertical posts, forked at the top for the reception of the transverse connecting pieces of each series; twelve of these pillars form the outer series, placed in a circle; and eight longer ones, the inner series, also describing a circle; the outer wall...
Page xxxiv - Home (branch of the Lincoln Institute) at Philadelphia, and selected four of the brightest of their number, who seemed to be the most promising through their advanced knowledge of English. With their help he gathered about three thousand terms of Wichita, which is a Caddoan dialect, also a large number of paradigms, sentences, and a few mythological texts. A thorough interchangeability of the consonants makes the study peculiarly difficult.
Page 23 - Indians (Cherokee) made very handsome carpets. They have a wild hemp that grows about six feet high, in open, rich, level lands, and which usually ripens in July; it is plenty on our frontier settlements. When it is fit for use, they pull, steep, peel, and beat it; and the old women spin it off the distaffs, with wooden machines, having some clay on the middle of them,21 to hasten the motion.
Page 59 - The materials also with which man has to deal are very much alike; wood, bone, and to a certain extent stone, have everywhere the same properties. The obsidian flakes of the Aztecs resemble the flint flakes of our ancestors, not so much because the ancient Briton resembled the Aztec, as because the fracture of flint is like that of obsidian.

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