A Theoretical and Practical Grammar of the French Tongue: In which the Present Usage is Displayed Agreeably to the Decisions of the French Academy

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Page 422 - I was desirous to add my name to this illustrious fraternity. I read all the poets of Persia and Arabia, and was able to repeat by memory the volumes that are suspended in the mosque of Mecca.
Page ii - IDE, of the said District, hath deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit : " Inductive Grammar, designed for beginners. By an Instructer." In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 424 - He must write as the interpreter of nature, and the legislator of mankind, and consider himself as presiding over the thoughts and manners of future generations ; as a being superior to time and place.
Page 424 - Want as much more, to turn it to its use; For wit and judgment often are at strife, Tho' meant each other's aid, like man and wife. 'Tis more to guide, than spur the Muse's steed; Restrain his fury, than provoke his speed; The winged courser, like a gen'rous horse, Shows most true mettle when you check his course.
Page 423 - ... or decoration of moral or religious truth ; and he, who knows most, will have most power of diversifying his scenes, and of gratifying his reader with remote allusions and unexpected instruction.
Page 422 - Whatever be the reason, it is commonly observed that the early writers are in possession of nature and their followers of art; that the first excel in strength and invention and the latter in elegance and refinement.
Page 354 - Human life is everywhere a state in which much is to be endured, and little to be enjoyed.
Page 423 - To a poet nothing can be useless. Whatever is beautiful, and whatever is dreadful, must be familiar to his imagination : he must be conversant with all that is awfully vast or elegantly little.
Page 423 - He must divest himself of the prejudices of his age or country ; he must consider right and wrong in their abstracted and invariable state ; he must disregard present laws and opinions, and rise to general and transcendental truths, which will always be the same...
Page 423 - ... scenes, and of gratifying his reader with remote allusions and unexpected instruction. All the appearances of nature I was therefore careful to study, and every country which I have surveyed has contributed something to my poetical powers. In so wide a survey, said the prince, you must surely have left much unobserved.

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