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THE

WORKS

OF

JOHN JEWEL, D. D.

BISHOP OF SALISBURY.

EDITED BY

RICHARD WILLIAM JELF, D. D.

CANON OF CHRIST CHURCH,

AND PRINCIPAL OF KING'S COLLEGE LONDON;

FORMERLY FELLOW OF ORIEL COLLEGE.

IN EIGHT VOLUMES.

VOL. VIII..

OXFORD,

AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

MDCCCXLVIII.

C1257.12 L(8),

HAT D UNIVERSITY

LIBRARY

A TREATISE

OF

THE SACRAMENTS,

GATHERED OUT OF CERTAIN SERMONS, WHICH THE REVEREND FATHER IN GOD, BISHOP JEWEL, PREACHED AT SALISBURY.

I

HAVE opened unto you the contents of the Lord's prayer, and shewed you upon whom we ought to call, and what to ask and the articles of our Christian faith, in God the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost; of the church, of remission of sins, of the resurrection, and of life everlasting, &c. And I have opened unto you the ten commandments, and, in them, what our duty is towards God, towards our prince and magistrates, towards our parents, towards our neighbour, and towards ourselves. All this have I done simply and plainly, without all show of learning, that it might the better sink into our hearts.

Now I think good to speak of the sacraments of the church, that all you may know what they are, because you are all partakers of the holy sacraments. Christ hath ordained them, that by them he might set before our eyes the mysteries of our salvation, and might more strongly confirm the faith, which we have in his blood, and might seal his grace in our hearts. As princes' seals confirm and warrant their deeds and charters; so do the sacraments witness unto our conscience that God's promises are true, and shall continue for ever. Thus doth God make known his secret purpose to his church: first, he declareth his mercy by his word; then he JEWEL, VOL. VIII.

B

[De Cons.

dist. 2. Sa

sealeth it, and assureth it by his sacraments.

In the word we have his promises; in the sacraments we see them.

It would require a long time, if I should utter that might be said in this matter: especially in laying open such errors and abuses, as have crept into the church. But I will have regard to this place, and so frame my speech, that the meanest and simplest may reap profit thereby. That you may the better remember it, I will keep this order. I will shew you, what a sacrament is: secondly, who hath ordained them: thirdly, wherefore they were ordained, and what they work in us fourthly, how many there are: and then I will briefly speak of every of them.

A sacrament is an outward and visible sign, whereby God sealeth up his grace in our hearts, to the confirmation of our faith. Saint Augustine saith: Sacramentum est invisibilis crificium.] gratiæ visibile signum: "A sacrament is a visible sign of grace invisible." And that we may the better understand him, he August. de telleth us what thing we should call a sign: "A sign is a Christiana, thing that besides the sight itself, which it offereth to the [iii. 19.] senses, causeth of itself some other certain thing to come to

doctrina

lib. 2. cap. I.

num epist. 5. [ii. 412.]

knowledge." In baptism, the water is the sign; and the thing signified, is the grace of God. We see the water, but the grace of God is invisible: we cannot see it. Moreover he Ad Marcelli. Saith: Signa, cum ad res divinas adhibentur, sacramenta vocantur: "Signs, when they be applied to godly things, be called sacraments." The signification and the substance of the sacrament, is to shew us, how we are washed with the passion of Christ, and how we are fed with the body of Christ. And again: "If sacraments had not a certain likeness and representation of the things whereof they be sacraments, then indeed they were no sacraments." And because of this likeness which they have with the things they represent, they be oftentimes termed by the names of the things themselves. Therefore after a certain manner of speech (and not otherwise) the sacrament of the body of Christ, is the body of Christ, and the sacrament of the blood of Christ, is the blood of Christ: so the sacrament of faith, is faith.

Aug. epist.

23. ad Boni.

facium. [il.

267.]

Who hath ordained the sacraments? Not any prelate, not any prince, not any angel, or archangel, but only God himself. For he only hath authority to seal the charter, in

1 Cor. [x. 51.]

whose authority only it is to grant it. And only he giveth the pledge, and confirmeth his grace to us, which giveth his grace into our hearts. Chrysostom saith: Divinum et inte- Hom. 7. in grum non esset mysterium, si quicquam ez te adderes: "The mystery were not of God, nor perfect, if thou shouldest put any thing to it." In the days of Noah, when God determined to be merciful unto his people, and never to drown the whole world with water, he said: "I have set my bow in the cloud, Gen. ix. 13. and it shall be for a sign of the covenant between me and the earth; and when I shall cover the earth with a cloud, and the bow shall be seen in the cloud, then will I remember my covenant which is between me and you, and between every living thing in flesh, and there shall be no more waters of a flood to destroy all flesh.”

Joh. xiii.

In like manner, when God would witness and stablish to Abraham, and his seed after him, the promise of his mercy, he himself ordained a sacrament to confirm the same: "This Gen. xvii. 10. is my covenant which ye shall keep between me and you, and thy seed after thee. Let every man child among you be circumcised." Thus God ordained the sacrament of circumcision. This sacrament was a seal of God's promise to Abraham, and a seal of Abraham's faith and obedience towards God. By this sacrament man was bound to the Lord : and by the same sacrament God vouchsafed to bind himself to man. But how is the sacrament formed? of what parts is it made? Augustine saith: Accedat verbum ad elementum, et Tract. 80. in fit sacramentum: "Join the word of Christ's institution with [iii. pt. 2. the sensible creature, and thereof is made a sacrament." Join the word to the creature of water, and thereof is made the sacrament of baptism: take away the word, then what is the water other than water? The word of God and the creature make a sacrament. But why were sacraments ordained? He telleth In nullum nomen religionis, ceu verum, &c. Lib. 19. con"Men cannot be gathered together to the profession of any cap. 1. [viil, religion, whether it be true or false, unless they be bound in the fellowship of visible signs or sacraments." The first cause why they were ordained is, that thereby one should acknowledge another, as followers of one household, and members of one body. So was all Israel reckoned the children of Abraham, because of their circumcision; and all such as were

you :

703.]

:
tra Faust.

319.]

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