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EDITED BY THE

REV. B. J. JOHNS,

HEAD-MASTER OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL, DULWICH COLLEGE.

AN

EASY AND PRACTICAL INTRODUCTION

TO THE

FRENCH LANGUAGE.

BY

JOHN HAAS,

TEACHER OF MODERN LANGUAGES, QUEENWOOD COLLEGE, HANTS.

Second Course.

LONDON:
DARTON AND CO., 58, HOLBORN HILL.

MDCCCLVIII.

303.c.78.

LONDON: WILLIAM STEVENS, PRINTER, 37, BELL YARD,

LINCOLN'S INN.

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PREFACE.

The First Course of the Easy and Practical Introduction to the French Language has now gone through five editions, and the present sequel has been long and earnestly called for.

Like the First, the Second Course is founded on Dr. Ahn's Practical Method of Learning French," written for German pupils. From the thirty-sixth edition of that work; a considerable number of sentences have been transcribed or translated; the whole matter, however, has not only been re-arranged and extended, þut entirely re-cast; all the rules have been added ; a more practical and modern character has been given to the vocabularies; from first to last, particular attention has been paid to idiomatic expressions, which have not been left to take their chance, but are everywhere prominently brought forward, and forced upon the pupil's attention and memory; and the Exercises in Reading have been selected with the special view of furnishing additional materials for conversation (see

p. 122).

It is scarcely necessary to add anything on the peculiar advantages of the method which forms the basis of this little work, its principles and leading features having been fully set forth in the preface to the First Course.

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EASY AND PRACTICAL

INTRODUCTION

TO THE

FRENCH LANGUAGE.

Second Course.

NOTE.-For New Words, see Vocabulary at the end of the book. Words marked with asterisks are the same in French as in English. Words marked with a zero are not to be translated. Two or more English words connected by a hyphen, are to be translated by one French word.

AUXILIARY VERB8.-IDIOMS.

WHICH

YOU

HAVE

LEARNT

IN

1. REPEAT THE TENSES OF THE AUXILIARY VERBS,

THE FIRST COURSE (Nos. 68-96). RULE. The Infinitive Mood, when used as a complement to a noun, is preceded by DE, as : J'ai l'honneur D'être, I have the honour to be, &c.

Auriez-vous la complaisance de me rendre ce service ? Il avait raison de parler ainsi. Nous

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