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" The letters are divided into Vowels and Consonants. The Vowels are a, e, i, o, u, y. "
New Grammar of French Grammars - Page 3
by Alain Auguste Victor de Fivas - 1847 - 182 pages
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The young woman's companion; or, Female instructor [by J.A. Stewart].

J A. Stewart - 1814
...Letters. OBTHOGRAPHY teaches the nature and powers of letters, and the just method of spelling words. Letters are divided into vowels and consonants-. The vowels are, a, e, i, o, « ; and sometimes w and y. W and y are consonants when they begin a word or syllable; but in every...
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The Elements of French Grammar; Revised and Enlarged by A. M. D. G ...

Charles François Lhomond - 1826
...words are composed of syllables ; syllables are composed of letters. There are two sorts of letters ; vowels and consonants. The vowels are, a, e, i, o, u, and y. They are called vowels, because they form a perfect sound of themselves, without the aid of consonants....
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The Complete Italian Master: Containing the Best and Easiest Rules for ...

Veneroni (sieur de) - Italian language - 1827 - 444 pages
...e,f, g, h, i,j, I, m, n,o, p, q,r, s, t, u, v,z. The Italians do not make use of k, w, x, y. ; The letters are divided into vowels and consonants. The vowels are, a, e, i, o, u. They are called vowels. from their forming a perfect sound without the assistance of any other letter,...
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Theoretical and Practical Grammar of the French Tongue

Jean P.V. Lecoutz de Levizac (l'abbe) - 1828
...sound by itself. A consonant, on the contrary, cannot be articulated without the assistance of a vowel. The vowels are a, e, i, o, u, and y, which sometimes has the sound of one i, and sometimes of two. The nineteen remaining letters, 6, c, d, f, g, ft, j, k, I, m, n, p, q, r, t, t, v, x, 2, are consonants....
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Walker's Pronouncing Dictionary of the English Language: Abridged for the ...

John Walker - English language - 1828 - 447 pages
...similitudes and specifick differences seem to require. Letters, therefore, are naturally divisible into vowels and consonants The vowels are a, e, i, o, u, and у and w when ending a syllable. The consonants are 6, c, d, /, g, h,j, k, I, m, n, p, q, r, s, t,...
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The French Teacher: Being a New and Methodized Plan of Grammatical ...

Saint Phorien André - French language - 1830 - 466 pages
.... . . x . . . . y — GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. The French ALPHABET contains twenty-five letters, which are divided into Vowels and Consonants. The vowels...a, e, i, o, u, and y, which sometimes has the sound ef one i, and sometimes of two, The nineteen remaining letters, b, c, d,f, g, h, j, It, I, m, n, p,...
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The Western Spelling Book: Being an Improvement of the American Spelling ...

Nathan Guilford - Spellers - 1831 - 144 pages
...of OUa. HE NEW YORK ASTOR.IFNOXAND 19C2 In the English language there are twenty-six letters, which are divided into vowels and consonants. The vowels are a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes w and y. A vowel is a simple sound of itself. A consonant has no sound, except when united...
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A selection of moral lessons, natural history, Bible lessons, and poetry

Alexander Spencer - 1831
...sentences comprise the whole subject of which it treats. The letters are twenty six in number, and are divided into vowels, and consonants. The vowels are a, e, i, o. u,; also, w and y are vowels, except when they begin a word or syllable. All thc rest of the letters are...
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Cobb's Expositor; Or, Sequel to the Spelling-book: Containing about Twelve ...

Lyman Cobb - English language - 1832 - 216 pages
...similitudes and specified differences seem to require. Letters, therefore, are naturally divisible into vowels and consonants. The vowels are, a, e, i, o, u, and w' and y when ending a syllable. The consonants are, 6, c, d, f, g, A, j, k. I, m, n, p, q, r, *, t,...
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A Theoretical and Practical Grammar of the French Tongue: In which the ...

Jean-Pons-Victor Lecoutz de Levizac - French language - 1833 - 444 pages
...sound by itself. A consonant, on the contrary, cannot be articulated without the assistance of a vowel. The vowels are a, e, i, o, u, and y, which sometimes has the sound of one i, and sometimes of two. The nineteen remaining letters, b, c, d,f, g, h, j, k, I, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, x, z, are consonants....
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