Intelligent Organizations: Powerful Models for Systemic Management

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Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 16, 2008 - Business & Economics - 229 pages
This is not a book about how to run a company. It is about how to look at the world differently. Ultimately, this will help the reader to deal with complexity more effectively. The market today is flooded with books which claim to show paths to higher organizational effectiveness. Most of these recommendations are given as “recipes for success” and on pragmatic grounds. This book, however, is targeted at all those who want access to the powerful models of systemic manageme nt in order to improve their skills in coping with complexity. The contents are of interest to people who deal with organizations – as leaders and mana gers or specialists, or as advanced students. The purpose is to give them conceptual and methodological guidelines by means of which they can. • Increase the “intelligence” of exis ting organizations by introducing or substituting a better design; • Shape new organizations so that they are “intelligent” from the very start. What are the distinctive features of this book? The book is the result of a long term research effort in to the deep seated, invariant features of organizations, ba sed on the Systems Approach, namely, Organizational Cybernetics and System Dynamics. These sciences have specialized in uncovering such basi c properties. They convey a fresh, sophisticated and unorthodox perspective. It is therefore worthwhile acq uiring the capability of looking at the social world in this different way.

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Contents

73 The Team Syntegrity Model TSM An Architecture for Large Groups
115
74 The Team Syntegrity Process
119
75 Applications
120
A Collaborative Global Research Project
121
763 The Process
122
764 Results
124
765 Some Insights
125
77 Further Empirical Evidence
128

Management A Distributed Function
23
32 On Control Loops
25
33 Control Versus Precontrol
28
35 Hierarchy Versus Heterarchy
29
36 Distributed Management
32
Intelligent Organization A Systemic Framework
35
42 Introducing the Framework
36
43 Dimensions of the Framework
38
44 Theoretical Models to Enhance Organizational Intelligence
42
45 Relationships Between the Models
43
Activities What the Organization Does
46
51 The Model of Systemic Control MSC
48
52 Operative Level
51
522 Creating and Delivering Value
52
53 Strategic Level
53
531 Existing Versus New Value Potentials
55
532 Strategic Business Unit Versus Whole Firm
58
533 Core Competencies
61
534 The Linkage Between Strategy and Profit Revisited
63
54 The Normative Level
64
542 Beyond Viability
65
55 Relationships Between the Three Levels
67
56 Criteria of Systemic Effectiveness
69
57 Insights Based on the Model of Systemic Control
71
58 Revisiting the Feedback Cycle
75
59 An Application Perspective
76
510 Intermediate Summary and Outlook
79
Structure Preconditions for Effective Action
83
62 On Recursive Organization Design
86
63 Recursion and Heterarchy
90
65 Virtual Organizations as Viable Systems
91
66 Networks as Viable Systems
94
67 Networks of Viable Systems
97
Hierarchy Heterarchy or Both?
100
69 Criticisms and Beyond
102
610 Autonomous Agents in Viable Organizations
103
611 An Application Perspective
105
612 Intermediate Summary and Outlook
107
Behaviour The Control of Cognition and Emotion
109
71 Behaviour in and of Organizations
110
72 Participation and Authority Social Behaviour for Complexity Absorption
114
78 Outlook
130
Ethos and Identity Basic Parameters of Organizations
133
81 Organizational Ethos
134
811 Change Versus Timelessness
135
Ethical and Esthetical Imperatives
136
8121 Ethics
137
8122 Esthetics
138
814 After all What is Good and What is Bad?
142
815 Orientation Explicitness and Reflection
146
82 Organizational Identity
147
83 Theory of the Firm
149
84 Some Empirical Evidence
152
85 Immoral Organizations
157
852 Are all Virtuous Organizations Intelligent?
158
86 More Empirical Evidence
159
861 IdealType More of the Same
160
87 Immoral Actors in Organizations
162
88 Intermediate Summary and Outlook
163
Time and Organizational Dynamics
166
91 Transformation Over Time
168
92 A Practical Example
169
93 Lessons from Computer Simulations
170
94 Intermediate Summary
178
The Framework Revisited
181
102 Organizational Principles in the Framework
183
1023 Behaviour
184
103 An Integrative View of the Dimensions and Models
185
104 Change and the Fundamental Parameters Revisited
189
105 Applications of the Framework
191
1051 Case 1
192
1052 Case 2
193
1054 Case 3
194
1055 Case 4
197
1056 Reflection
198
106 Relevant Empirical Work by Other Authors
199
107 Intermediate Summary and Outlook
200
Outlook The Way Ahead
203
Appendix
207
References
210
Index
231
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