The Yale Literary Magazine, Volume 19

Front Cover
1854
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Page 299 - Thanks to the human heart by which we live, Thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and fears ; To me the meanest flower that blows can give Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears.
Page 151 - They slept on the abyss, without a surge; The waves were dead; the tides were in their grave; The moon, their mistress, had expired before ; The winds were withered in the stagnant air, And the clouds perished: Darkness had no need Of aid from them — she was the universe.
Page 337 - So dear to Heaven is saintly Chastity, That, when a soul is found sincerely so, A thousand liveried angels lackey her, Driving far off each thing of sin and guilt ; And, in clear dream and solemn vision, Tell her of things that no gross ear can hear...
Page 338 - She mental breadth, nor fail in childward care. Nor lose the childlike in the larger mind : Till at the last she set herself to man. Like perfect music unto noble words; And so these twain, upon the skirts of Time, Sit side by side, full-summed in all their powers. Dispensing harvest, sowing the To-be, Self-reverent each and reverencing each, Distinct in individualities, But like each other even as those who love.
Page 166 - As when fire is with water commix'd and contending, And the spray of its wrath to the welkin up-soars, And flood upon flood hurries on, never ending ; And it never will rest, nor from travail be free, Like a sea that is laboring the birth of a sea.
Page 173 - May we know what this new doctrine, whereof thou speakest, is? 20 For thou bringest certain strange things to our ears : we would know therefore what these things mean. 21 (For all the Athenians, and strangers which were there, spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing...
Page 211 - For they lie beside their nectar, and the bolts are hurled Far below them in the valleys, and the clouds are lightly curled Round their golden houses, girdled with the gleaming world...
Page 126 - Instantly, when my ear caught this vast jEolian intonation, when my eye filled with the golden fulness of life, the pomps of the heavens above, or the glory of the flowers below, and turning when it settled upon the frost which overspread my sister's face, instantly a trance fell upon me. A vault seemed to open in the zenith of the far blue sky, a shaft which ran up for ever.
Page 30 - And now the bell — the bell she had so often heard by night and day, and listened to with solemn pleasure almost as a living voice — rung its remorseless toll for her, so young, so beautiful, so good. Decrepit age, and vigorous life, and blooming youth, and helpless infancy, poured forth — on crutches, in the pride of strength and health, in the full blush of promise, in the mere dawn of life — to gather round her tomb.
Page 125 - I stood checked for a moment ; awe, not fear, fell upon me; and, whilst I stood, a solemn wind began to blow — the saddest that ear ever heard. It was a wind that might have swept the fields of mortality for a thousand centuries.

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